Help! I Want out of my NJ Real Estate Contract!

NJ real estate

The main goal of the negotiations surrounding a NJ real estate deal is for all parties involved to sign a contract they’re happy with. Sellers want to make a profit on their property and buyers want to have confidence in the huge investment they just made for their future. Sometimes, though, both parties sign on the dotted line only to find themselves second-guessing their decision. If something doesn’t seem right or you start to realize you didn’t get as much out of the deal as you had hoped, you may find yourself wanting out of the deal.

Is it possible to back out of a signed NJ real estate contract?

The good news is that even after you sign, there are still some ways to get yourself out of a real estate contract, but you have to act quickly. In New Jersey, the 3 day attorney review period will allow you to work with an attorney to bring your concerns back into negotiation. It is critical that you take advantage of New Jersey’s unique 3 day review period. During this time, you will work with your real estate attorney to review all aspects of the contract. As long as you’re within the attorney review period, you can make changes to the contract or walk away from the deal altogether.

What if I missed the attorney review period but still want out of my contract?

After the 3 day review period has passed, it is much more difficult to “un-sign” your name from your NJ real estate contract. In our experience, the three main reasons for a broken real estate contract are:

  1. Unsatisfactory appraisal
  2. Significant inspection issues
  3. Contingency clauses

Many real estate contracts include a contingency stating that the buyer and their lender must approve of the inspection and appraisal before a deal can move forward. If the buyer or lender is unsatisfied with the results of the inspection, appraisal (or both), it could open the door for further negotiations.

An appraisal price that is significantly lower than the purchase price will raise huge red flags for a lender and can give the buyer leverage to re-open contract negotiations. Likewise, a home inspection that turns up significant issues could give the buyer cause to break the contract if a seller is unwilling to make the necessary repairs.

While issues with inspection or appraisal can help the buyer back out of a contract, the “kick-out” clause of a real estate contract can be utilized by sellers. Traditionally, real estate contracts include a contingency clause that protects buyers from carrying two mortgages. The language usually reads like: “Buyer’s obligation to purchase this property is contingent on the sale of their current home.”

In today’s real estate market, many contracts now include contingency clauses that protect the seller if closing is dependent on the buyer selling their current home (as shown in the example above). Known as the “kick-out” clause, this contingency allows the seller to entertain other, potentially better offers on a property as long as the original potential buyer’s property has not sold. If a new buyer is found, the seller can “kick out” the original buyer and accept the new offer.

The key to getting out of a real estate contract is working closely with a trusted real estate attorney. In addition to helping you legally back out of a contract, your New Jersey real estate attorney will use the law to work in your best interest throughout the entirety of contract negotiations. Veitengruber Law will point out any issues or reservations about a contract early in the process. Understanding the ins and outs of a contract before you sign can save you the trouble of backing out later.

Our NJ real estate team is experienced in handling all of the complex legal details that go into real estate contracts. Working with us will ensure a smoother transaction and will get what you want! Don’t wait until you sign the contract to realize you need the advice of an expert attorney. Call us today for your free consultation about your real estate goals.

When “Time is of the Essence” in a NJ Real Estate Contract

nj real estate

Whether you are buying or selling a property, knowing the details of NJ real estate laws is important to help you make the right legal decisions. For instance, many people believe the closing date written in the contract for sale is the actual closing date on the purchase or sale of a property. However, in New Jersey the closing date is not essential to the terms of the contract and is therefore not binding. This means the date of closing on the contract is not a hard date, but is instead an estimate of when the closing will take place. Either the buyer or the seller in the contract can request—and must be legally afforded—a reasonable postponement of the closing date. This can be an unwelcome surprise for a party that is ready to close. At Veitengruber Law, our goal is to eliminate confusion by ensuring legal clarity in every real estate contract we oversee.

In New Jersey, the only way to ensure a binding closing date is if both parties agree to “time is of the essence” terms. “Time is of the essence” is a legal phrase used to remind everyone involved in a real estate transaction that the clock is ticking. Once “time is of the essence” is introduced into a NJ real estate contract, the closing date becomes essential to the terms of the contract and is therefore legally binding.

Failure to close on the specified date when time is of the essence constitutes a material breach of contract, opening the non-complying party to liability. Many attorneys will not agree to make a closing date essential in a contract because it opens up their clients to increased liability, even if the client is unable to close because of circumstances outside of their control.


Veitengruber Law handles essential closing dates with ease for clients who are buying or selling a NJ property.


Veitengruber Law provides our clients with a clear understanding of how “time is of the essence” works in a real estate contract. The party who declares“time is of the essence” has to provide clear written notice to the non-declaring party. The notice must comply with the requirements set forth in the contract of sale and be sent to all parties indicated in the contract, typically by certified mail. If the party receiving the notice believes the notice is improper, they must object to the notice in a timely manner. In order to reject the notice, they must list the reasons for objection and similarly notify all concerned parties of the contract via certified and regular mail. Failure to provide a timely notice of objection may waive the non-declaring party’s ability to do so at a later date.

The declaring party must also give the non-declaring party a sufficient or “reasonable” amount of time in which to close the contract. “Reasonable” in this specific capacity, is determined by the courts on a case by case basis. The courts will decide what is reasonable by:

  • Considering the nature of the contract
  • Examining past conduct of both parties
  • Determining whether or not good faith was practiced during the negotiations, and finally,
  • Concluding whether potential hardships or prejudices exist that could affect either party’s ability to close on time

Two weeks is a customary “time is of the essence” extension for residential NJ real estate transactions and more time may be provided for commercial real estate contracts.


If one party is ready to close and the other party will not agree to a closing date, it may be wise to implement “time is of the essence” language in your NJ contract of sale. Once the original date of closing in the contract passes, the party that is ready to close can set a new closing date declaring “time is of the essence.” This new date will contractually obligate the other party to close on that date or be in breach of contract. If the non-declaring party still does not close by the date set forth under “time is of the essence,” the declaring party can seek legal remedies against the party in breach. With “time is of the essence,” we can save our clients valuable time, money and stress throughout their real estate transactions.


At Veitengruber Law, we strive to eliminate any confusion by ensuring legal clarity in all of the real estate contracts we handle.


Declaring “time is of the essence” is a valuable tool for real estate contract negotiations in New Jersey. It ensures a hard close date and legal recourse for parties ready to close on a contract. It is important to be smart about introducing “time is of the essence” to a real estate contract. Veitengruber Law has years of experience handling commercial and residential real estate transactions. Our attorneys can advise on even the most complex real estate cases with efficiency and professional expertise. Call us today to get knowledgeable guidance on any aspect(s) of your NJ real estate negotiations.