Budgeting for NJ Business Owners

NJ Business Owners

If you’re a NJ business owner, you know it is essential to find efficient ways to keep track of your finances. Establishing a business budget can help you track and organize your financial resources so you can make informed decisions about how to run your business. But not every budget is the same and different budgets work better for different companies. There are a variety of budgets to help you manage your spending and utilize successful strategies in order to maximize your assets and revenues. Here, we lay out some of the most popular budget plans for your business:

  1. Master Budget

Your master budget is the big picture. It combines all of a company’s individual budgets (sales, operating expenses, income streams, etc.) to help business owners evaluate the overall performance of their business. This type of budget will give you a comprehensive overview of your company’s general financial health. This budget is best utilized by larger companies, allowing different managers to see how their departments’ progress aligns with company goals.

  1. Operating Budget

An operating budget is typically what business owners think of when they hear the word “budget.” This type of budget is a projected forecast of income and expenses over a specific period of time. An operating budget allows business owners to get an understanding of their business’s financial health on a weekly, monthly, and yearly basis. Over time, owners or managers can analyze this data to figure out in what areas overspending is occurring.

  1. Financial Budget

Unlike an operating budget, a financial budget looks beyond income and expenses to assets, liabilities, and equity. Typically, data for a financial budget is laid out in a balance sheet to provide an overview of the financial health of the business. This kind of budget is very important for determining a business’s value relative to public stock offerings, funding opportunities, or for a merger.

  1. Cash Flow Budget

A cash flow budget allows business owners to project how and when cash comes into and out of a business during a specific time period. This helps a business understand if they are managing their money efficiently. In analyzing a cash flow budget, a business owner can see whether or not upcoming financial obligations will be met or if they need to look into other financing options.

  1. Labor Budget

If your business has employees, creating a labor budget is important to help you determine how many workers you need to employ to achieve your desired level of productivity. This budget is helpful for establishing payroll costs of running your business and, in some cases, planning for the hiring of seasonal workers.

  1. Capital Budget

This budget is helpful for business owners preparing to purchase large assets like expensive machinery, new technology, or a bigger work space. This kind of budget establishes what the cost of the new asset is and analyzes whether or not the predicted return on investment is worth the expense of the purchase. This can help business owners plan for a big purchase as well as determine cost effectiveness.

  1. Strategic Plan Budget

Most businesses work under the vision of a strategic plan. A strategic plan sets up the long term goals of a business—but doesn’t always include long term budget goals. Make sure you don’t make that mistake. By including financial information in your overall vision for your business, you can better understand how you need to plan in order to create financial growth.

  1. Static Budget

A static budget is a financial plan that remains fixed. This a good budget for businesses that have very predictable and consistent income and expenses. Business owners are able to judge the performance of their business by comparing their static budget to the actual financial performance of their business. This can be particularly useful in monitoring a increase or decrease in sales performance.

Budgets are important to the success of any business. Besides allowing you to track your success internally, a well maintained budget can help you attract investors or secure business loans in the future. Don’t overlook the importance of creating an effective financial plan for your business. Veitengruber Law offers the long-term planning you need. Our experienced team can help you devise a sound financial plan to protect your assets and grow your business to new levels of success.

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What to do When Your Client Files for Bankruptcy

NJ collections attorney

From the perspective of a company owner doing business with a client (or company) who files for bankruptcy: how can you go about getting (even some of) the money you’re owed?

The second someone files for bankruptcy of any type, the Automatic Stay slams down like a sledgehammer – coming between the bankruptcy filer and anyone they owe money to. The Automatic Stay protects debtors during the bankruptcy process by making it illegal for any creditor to make contact asking for money.

Why can’t I contact my client?

After all, you and your client likely signed a working contract wherein you agreed to provide services and they agreed to pay you X amount of dollars for said services. Even though you continued to provide your end of the deal, your client filed for bankruptcy and now you aren’t even allowed to contact them. This can be very frustrating for a business owner who is owed payment(s) – money that may very well be making or breaking the creditor’s own business.

The reason you can’t contact a bankruptcy client is because the Automatic Stay is a protective measure put into place by the bankruptcy court to protect struggling debtors. It gives them enough time and breathing room to gather their financial information and meet with their bankruptcy attorney and/or a potential NJ credit counselor to come up with a plan that makes sense for getting them back on their feet again.

Chapter 11 and 13 bankruptcies are filed with the intention of reorganizing monies owed into a more feasible and achievable payment plan. As soon as these bankruptcy cases are complete – you will once again begin receiving payment from your client. According to their debt reorganization plan, you may not receive the full amount due, but you will get paid.

That’s the good news.

The bad news is that the vast majority of bankruptcies filed today are chapter 7, which entails debtors liquidating assets and discharging many of their debts altogether. If your client files for chapter 7 bankruptcy, you may have to write off their past due amount as a loss. In any case, remember NOT to contact them at all until you receive notice that their bankruptcy case is no longer active in the NJ Courts system.


To contact a debtor while they are actively going through the bankruptcy process (if an Automatic Stay is in place) means that you risk being sued. You will have broken the bankruptcy code if you even attempt to contact a bankruptcy client.


 

What You Can Do:

  • File a Proof of Claim – Downloadable from the USCourts online and easy to fill out.
  • Attend the Meeting of the Creditors; also known as the 341 Hearing – At this meeting, you will be able to question your client. You’ll also be permitted to object to the repayment or reorganization plan if you deem it unfair.
  • Thoroughly review any plan that is formulated by the debtor and their trustee. If less than half of their creditors do not consent with the plan, it won’t be approved by the bankruptcy court.
  • Make sure you are listed on the Creditor Matrix.
  • Wait and see. Truthfully, most of your time will be spent waiting to find out the outcome of your client’s case. If the case is dismissed, or “thrown out,” you will once again be allowed to attempt collection. If an agreement or repayment plan was formulated, you will receive a notice about how much you can collect. Be sure that all of your contact information is correct with the bankruptcy court and your client’s bankruptcy attorney to ensure you will receive any and all payments.