3 Ways to Teach Your Kids About Budgeting

budgeting

Every parent wants the best for their child. As a parent, it is your goal to raise bright, capable adults. And yet, even while saving thousands towards their child’s college fund, many parents do not discuss financial issues with their children. Many parents wait until high school to begin having financial discussions with their kids, but many financial experts caution against this. While it may seem shocking that your four year old is picking up financial habits, children actually start developing an understanding of money from a very early age. Even if your kids are already in their teens, it is never too late to start teaching them smart ways to earn, spend, and save money. If you are ready to have the money talk with your kids, here are some great ideas to start.

1. Teach them how to earn money.

Some parents do not like the idea of an allowance earned for work kids should be doing as contributing members of a household. It can also be difficult to find the funds for a weekly allowance. But an allowance can help your kids connect early on that work and money go hand in hand. Allowances do not have to be a lot. Starting off with quarters for certain tasks or a dollar a week can still facilitate the same lesson. You can choose to reward household chores that go above and beyond the normal household work, or instead opt to provide a financial reward for earning specific grades in school (or other similar milestones.)

If you have a little one with an entrepreneurial spirit, encourage them to practice their business savvy with babysitting jobs, neighborhood yard work, or a lemonade stand. The main goal here is to connect hard work with financial gain. Money does not just magically appear and it is important for kids to understand the dedication and commitment required to earn a buck.

2. Teach them how to spend money.

One of the biggest lessons you can teach your child is how to differentiate between needs and wants. Even adults struggle with this lesson sometimes, so including your kids in conversations about spending can give them the head start they need for future financial success. We often make financial decisions on behalf of our children without explaining why. If your child is begging for ice cream on your weekly grocery run, instead of just saying “no,” take a minute to explain why getting chicken, potatoes, and veggies for the whole family is more important. When back to school shopping, explain why pencils and notebooks are more important than decorations for their locker.

In addition to this, let your kids make real life transactions. Help them count out coins from their allowance to buy a treat. When they are a little older, make them responsible for buying their lunch by giving them actual money instead of simply adding money to their online account. A big part of being a financially healthy adult is knowing how to spend responsibly. Teaching budgeting skills early can set your child up for success in the future.

3. Teach them how to save money.

Let’s face it: saving money can be boring for adults, much less kids. It can be hard for kids to fight the desire to instantly gratify their spending urges when they finally have money of their own. Adding a little creativity and fun to savings can liven up the process while still allowing your kids to learn very important financial lessons. Have your child draw something that symbolizes the item they are saving for and then slowly start to color it in the more they save for it. This will give them a visual to remind them of their goals and help them see how far they have come in achieving them.

While piggy banks are time tested savings tools for smaller children, when your child get a little older it may be worthwhile to open a savings account in their name. Whether you do this at an actual bank or online, opening an account for your child will give you the opportunity to teach your kids about banking. From monthly statements and fees to deposits and withdrawals, your child will be able to watch their savings grow. You could even designate this savings account for college, a car, or some other big financial expense. Involving your child in the saving process for these big ticket items will help your child feel invested in their financial future.

There are plenty of creative and meaningful ways to teach your kids about good financial habits. Taking the time to provide lessons about money now can save them from struggling in the future. When it comes to teaching your kids about money, it is never too early to start!