What to do with Your Old 401(k) When Changing Jobs

401k

When you are looking forward to a new job, your retirement savings plan is typically not the first thing on your mind. However, for many of us, an employer-sponsored 401(k) is one the biggest and most financially beneficial perks of a job. Your 401(k) is your future. It is a huge factor in your ability to retire when you are ready and live comfortably in your golden years. That being said, what happens to your old 401(k) when you leave your current job? The best decision will often depend on your specific financial circumstances. Here, we look at the four options you have for your 401(k) when you are starting a new job.

1. Leave it

Of all the options available to you, leaving your 401(k) where it is with your previous employer is the easiest option. The money in your account will continue to grow tax-deferred and be available to you upon retirement. If the plan comes with low fees and good investment options, you may want to stick with it. There are some cons to keeping your 401(k) with your previous employer. Depending on the employer, you may not be able to make additional contributions, take a plan loan, or make a partial withdrawal once you leave. Some employers will charge higher fees if you aren’t an active employee. There is also the risk that you could miss important updates about your plan, or forget about the account entirely. This option will highly depend on your individual circumstances and the details of your former employer’s plan.

2. Roll it into your new plan

While this may not be an option with all plans and every place of employment, this option will allow your retirement savings to continue growing, tax-deferred. You will be allowed to make contributions to the account, typically after a mandatory probation period ends. If your new employer has a better plan (lower fees, better investment options, etc.), it might be worthwhile to take your money with you. There are two ways you can roll your old 401(k) into your new one:

  • Direct rollover: The administrator of your old plan transfers the money directly into your new 401(k) account.
  • Indirect rollover: The administrator of your old plan transfers the money directly to you. Then you must manually apply the money to your new account. This option is typically for people who are in need of a short-term loan. Your employer will withhold 20% for taxes in case you decide to keep the money outright. If you add the money to your account in full within 60 days, the 20% will be returned to you when you file your tax returns.

3. Roll it into an IRA

Instead of rolling over your savings into another 401(k), you could put those funds into an individual retirement account (IRA). Because this account does not have to be connected to an employer, it is a great option for those leaving their job to go back to school, become stay-at-home parents, start their own business, or for those who do not have access to another 401(k). The money can be sent directly or indirectly, only this time you will not have to pay taxes like you would with a 401(k) or a Roth IRA. With an IRA, your money will be able to grow tax-deferred and you will have access to a wider variety of investment options than with a 401(k). An IRA also does not require you to pay fees if you withdraw your money for college, to buy your first home, or to pay off medical debt.

4. Cash Out Your 401(k)

When it comes to deciding whether or not to cash out your 401(k), it really depends on you and your specific circumstances. Most financial planners and asset protection attorneys will advise against it; taxes and penalties will cause you to lose a big chunk of the money you and your employer have invested. However, you know your financial situation best. You may need a big lump of cash to go back to school, as an emergency fund when one parent decides to stay home with the kids, or to start your own business. If you are considering cashing out your 401(k), you MUST make sure you understand what it will cost you.

When you cash out your 401(k), your employer will typically withhold 20% of your balance to pay off the IRS. You will also have to pay state taxes and, if you are under 59 ½, a 10% early withdrawal fee. It is also important to understand that by cashing out this money early, you will be missing out on the money your account could be making in the years between now and retirement. A 401(k) with $50,000.00 when you are 35 will turn into $216,000 by the time you retire at 65. If you were to cash out this 401(k) now, after taxes, fees, and penalties, you would receive approximately $35,000.

Veitengruber Law has experience providing long-term planning guidance at any stage in your career. Protecting your assets and preparing for retirement will look different for every client. We offer personalized strategies to help you make informed decisions about your retirement goals.

Advertisements

5 Mistakes to Avoid if You Ever Want to Retire

People can spend their entire working lives dreaming about retirement. Retirement is a time to travel, to enjoy leisurely days, and to do the things we have always wanted to do. How comfortable our golden years will be depends a lot on how well we prepare for retirement. More and more often, would-be retirees are finding they must work long after they wish to retire because they did not save enough money to get by without working. If you want to avoid working into your 70s, here five common mistakes to avoid.

1. Start Planning Too Late

Most of us aren’t thinking about retirement when we first enter the work force.  Young workers believe they have plenty of time to save or that they can’t afford to put money towards retirement. But starting to plan for retirement as soon as possible can make a huge difference down the road. Every year sooner that a young worker starts saving for retirement takes about a year off how long they will have to work. Starting to plan for retirement too late can make it very difficult to make up the difference. Even if all you can only save a little, it is important to start saving as soon as possible.

2. Having Too Much Debt

It will be hard to make any serious plans for retirement if you’re struggling under a mountain of debt. It is important to include being smart about debt when you are planning for retirement. If possible, consolidate your debt. This could lower your monthly payments which would free up money you could put towards your retirement savings. If most of your debt is from credit cards with high interest rates, it may be worthwhile to look into refinancing that debt. Personal loans with fixed interest rates can help you save money by spending less on high interest debt.

3. Taking Money Out of Your 401(k)

It can be very tempting to cash out money from your 401(k), especially when sudden and expensive life events occur. A lot of people also end up cashing out their 401(k) when they leave a job. While using the money you have saved in your 401(k) before retirement can seem like a good idea at the time, it can really damage your ability to retire comfortably later. Early withdrawals can come with high penalties and taxes. In a financial emergency, it is better to take out a low-interest loan than cash out money from your 401(k). This will allow your retirement fund to remain untouched as it continues to grow. Another option is to borrow against your 401(k). This way, you are borrowing from yourself and paying yourself back as your 401(k) keeps growing.

4. Assuming Social Security Will Be Enough

The average Social Security retirement benefit is $1,411.00 per month which is about $17,000 per year. Assuming this will be enough, or even close to enough, to live off of in retirement can be a big mistake. If you earned more during your working years, you will collect more than that. However, the max benefit is $2,788 per month. For many retirees, this is simply not enough to pay for monthly bills, medical expenses, and other financial responsibilities.

5. Underestimating How Long Your Retirement Will Be

In the US, people tend to retire around age 62 or 63. Knowing when to retire can be hard as you do not want to retire too early and run out of money, but you also want to enjoy the personal benefits of retiring as early as you can. The hard part is you never know how long you will live into retirement. The money you saved might get you to 85, but what happens after that? On top of this, many people end up retiring earlier than they planned. Health reasons, downsizing, or a workplace closure can all cause older workers to retire early. For this reason, it is wise to work as long as possible.

The key to retiring well is to plan well. Get started as early as possible and follow these tips to ensure you can enjoy your golden years in peace and financial security. You work hard to provide for yourself and your family. Make sure all that hard work pays off in the end by taking steps towards your retirement goals today.

How to Budget for Travel in Retirement

travel in retirement

A lot of people anticipate that their retirement years will be a great time to travel. With more freedom and less time constraints, retirees can spend their days seeing the places they have always wanted to see. On the other hand, it can be hard to see the world on a fixed income. Luckily, jet-setting during your golden years is very possible if you take steps before retirement to budget appropriately for it.

First, you’ll need to be able to answer this question: What are your travel goals?

A budget for one yearly vacation is going to be very different from a budget for extended, more frequent travel to many different areas of the world. This is why it is crucial to determine what your travel goals are. Doing so will help you to plan accordingly. Make a list of places you want to see and get an estimate for how much it will cost to travel to each place.

In planning your retirement travel goals, you’ll need to make sure you don’t leave out any important travel costs. Remember to research costs for:

  • Flight tickets
  • Car rentals
  • Train tickets
  • Taxis/buses/subway fare
  • Dining
  • Tipping
  • Lodging
  • Sightseeing (guided tours, etc)
  • Travel gear
  • Souvenirs/other purchases

It’s a good idea to talk to other retirees who also have the “traveling bug” to see what their recommendations are or if they know of any good travel deals.

After you know your travel goals and approximate costs, you can figure this into your retirement plan. Before retirement, this may mean setting aside some of your savings into a travel fund with the goal of reaching a certain specified amount by the time you retire. Typically, it is considered safe to spend 4% or less of your total retirement savings per year without having to worry about running out of money. This 4% should also take into account everyday living expenses like taxes, food, health care and insurance. After retirement, you may continue to receive some kind of monthly income from Social Security, property you own and rent or investment proceeds. Make sure this income is calculated into your budget.

Look over the list of places you want to visit and put them in a list in order of priority. Next, create a timeline for your travels. This will not only give you concrete things to look forward to, but will help you figure out how much money you will be putting towards travel and when. This can give you a better idea of how travel will fit into your yearly budget. Maybe you will skip traveling a few years in a row to go on a dream trip. You may find your budget in retirement changes year to year depending on your travel plans. Be aware of the impact travel will have on your budget and plan accordingly. Maybe this will mean moving into a smaller house, eliminating a second vehicle, or even just spending less money eating out or on other unnecessary “luxury” activities.

During retirement, it is important to make every dollar count. Thankfully, with less time constraints, it is easier for retirees to stretch a dollar. Scheduling a trip during the off season is a great way to lower your overall cost. Take the time to watch airline deals online with sites like Expedia and Fly.com. Flexibility with when you travel (which will be possible in retirement) will allow you to take trips when they are most cost-effective. The longer you stay in one hotel, the more likely it is that you can negotiate a lower lodging rate. Combining long trips into one big trip can help you save on airfare.


Remember to always look for any senior travel discounts and do not be afraid to take advantage of every single one!


As with any kind of budget, you’re never going to be able to perfectly calculate exactly how much everything will be ahead of time. This is why one of the most important aspects of travel budgeting is leaving yourself a buffer. Spur-of-the-moment excursions, taxis, tips for staff and meals can sometimes exceed your planned allowance. A buffer will cover these extra expenses so you aren’t caught unprepared. Going with this rule, it is a good idea to get travel insurance. While it will make your trip slightly more expensive, it can save you big later if your travels are disrupted or a health issue forces you to cancel your trip.

Traveling can be a rewarding opportunity to have meaningful experiences in your golden years. If you are still preparing for retirement, now is the ideal time to assess where you are in achieving your retirement goals. Don’t let poor budgeting hold you back from living your retirement dreams!

Student Loan Relief for NJ Retirees

NJ retirees

A growing number of people entering retirement are struggling to afford their student loan payments. Some older borrowers may have taken out loans for themselves to go back to school later in life, while others co-signed loans for their children or grandchildren. As of 2015, the average student loan debt owed by borrowers 65+ was $23,500 and nearly 40% of those loans were in default.* Carrying student loan debt into your 60’s can make it extremely difficult to sustain your standard of living through retirement.

 

Even worse news is that an increasing number of borrowers in retirement have had portions of their Social Security retirement and disability benefits garnished for nonpayment of federal student loans. If a loan is in default, lenders can take up to 15% of a retiree’s monthly Social Security benefits. This can affect retirees’ ability to buy food, pay for housing or afford needed medication. If you are struggling to make student loan payments under a retirement budget, consider the following options.

 

Many lenders offer loan modification options for borrowers struggling to keep up with their payments. Some offer ways to temporarily reduce student loan payments through deferment or forbearance. Deferment will allow you to put off your loans for a designated time period, usually no longer than three years. Borrowers approved for deferment will not have to make payments during that time. Under some loan agreements, you may even be able to defer interest accrued during the deferment period.

 

Forbearance is similar to deferment, with some slight differences. Under forbearance, your loans will be paused or reduced for up to a year. Your interest, however, will still continue to accrue under forbearance. Many times, lenders will allow borrowers to apply for an elective forbearance with the understanding that this kind of loan modification can only be utilized a limited number of times. It is important to note that these types of interventions are effective for momentary financial struggles, but are not long-term solutions. These options will allow you to postpone repayment, but they do not take away the debt.

 

Under some circumstances, you may be able to file a special request to get your student loan debt forgiven. This request must include a written Complaint indicating the student loan debt is causing undue hardship on the borrower. The official legal Complaint will be served in court together with a Summons on the applicable lender(s). A judge will then decide whether or not to forgive all or some of the student loan debt. This decision will be based on the borrower’s income, their financial hardships, any medical hardships and whether or not the individual has previously tried in good faith to make the loan payments.

 

While you can file this Complaint yourself, the document must be in a special format and include very specific information about the borrower’s financial situation. Up to 40% of these cases result in at least a partial loan forgiveness for the borrower. While law firms do charge a fee to assist in these filings, it’s easy to see that you’d likely get a huge return on your investment of the expert help of an experienced attorney. At Veitengruber Law, we know what judges are looking for in these filings and can help you present a detailed case that is likely to be decided in your favor.

 

Student loan debt can be hard to manage at any age, and especially so for those living on a fixed income. Don’t let student loan debt drain your financial resources in retirement. Call us today to get individualized advice on your specific case.

 

*Statistics from AARP

Budgeting in Retirement: Living Well in Your Golden Years

budgeting in retirement

Having a well thought-out budget is the best way to start your retirement on the right foot. Retirees must plan to have a form of steady income and create a budget that fits their expected lifestyle. In retirement, financial priorities will change with your changing lifestyle. It can sometimes be hard to determine what kind of retirement budget is realistic until you have entered retirement. While some people overestimate their expenses in retirement, some people struggle to adapt to life on a fixed income. For these reasons, it is a good idea to revisit your budget several times a year.

Retirement involves a lot of big changes, but one of the biggest changes is how most people get paid. Instead of receiving a weekly or biweekly paycheck, retirees typically rely on income that pays out once a month. On top of this, many people find their monthly income reduced in retirement. It can be a big mental shift for people entering retirement to suddenly adjust to all of these changes. Sometimes the best way to adjust your budget in retirement is to go back to basics. Here is how you can take one month to monitor and analyze your retirement budget:

Throughout the month, keep all receipts, payment confirmations, and a tally of any cash spent. It is best to record these expenses daily so you do not accidentally leave something out. Use a spreadsheet, notebook, or app to track your expenses. In tracking spending for a month, you can get a good idea of where your money is going. At the end of the month, sort your expenses into categories: groceries, dining out, entertainment, phone, utilities, housing, insurance, transportation, etc. Be sure to factor in irregular expenses like holidays and birthdays. Your expenses in December are likely to be a lot different than your expenses in June, for instance.

Next, analyze the results. This analysis is meant to be a realistic assessment of your lifestyle as it relates to your spending and income. Where is your money going each month? If your monthly budget was based on your pre-retirement lifestyle, you may see some significant differences between your expected spending and your actual expenses. Maybe you spend less on transportation and entertainment, but you spend more on eating out and medical expenses. Pay attention to these shifts in spending and make sure you are adjusting your budget accordingly.

After you have identified the trends in your spending, figure out where you can cut expenses. Determine which expenses are needs (like bills, housing, transportation, etc.) and which expenses are wants (like entertainment, hobbies, and gifts). In retirement, your “needs” may change. While you may have needed two cars when you and your spouse were working, is this still a necessary expense? Are you eligible for discounts to your cell phone or insurance plan? While you want to make sure you cover your essential expenses first, finding ways to make cuts to necessary spending will give you more financial freedom in general.

Finally, it’s time to put all these insights into your finances to create a new plan for your budget. Identify five goals that make sense for your income and expected expenses. Goals help you align your budget with the intention of getting the most out of your income. Make your goals specific and give yourself deadlines. Find ways to keep yourself accountable. Sign up for auto-pay, use an envelope system to categorize your spending, or get your spouse or partner to join you in your strides to reach your goals. A budget is only as good as your ability to stick with it!

You can do this financial check-in every six months or whenever your budget seems to be spread too thin. Sticking to a budget will help you feel more secure and relaxed so you can enjoy your golden years. Get your finances back on track by taking a fresh look at your retirement budget as we move toward the New Year!

Retired in New Jersey – Do I Really Need a Car?

retired in New Jersey

Owning a car gives you the freedom to hop in and drive wherever you want, whenever you want. While most of us tend to see this convenience as a necessity, the cost of owning a car can be a major burden on your budget—especially after retirement. When it comes to deciding whether or not you really need a car, it is important to consider your individual needs. Here are some things to think about if you’re wondering if you can get by without a vehicle.

After retirement, of course you want to spend your money pursuing lifelong dreams and kicking back. But many people find themselves struggling to maintain their lifestyle with retirement savings. There are few choices that can make as big of a financial difference as the choice to give up your car. The following is a typical breakdown of monthly car expenses:

  • Car Payment: $300.00 per month
  • Gas: $150.00 per month
  • Insurance: $80.00 per month
  • Maintenance: $100 per month
  • Parking: $40.00 per month
  • Depreciation: $200.00 per month

These expenses add up fast!  The average car owner spends $870.00 a month on their car—and that’s not including the potentially huge cost(s) of unforeseeable repairs in the event that something breaks or you are involved in an accident. If you are a multiple-car household, these costs can absorb a huge amount of your budget. Even giving up just one car can save you thousands throughout the year.

So getting rid of your car can help you save big, but how will you get around without one? There might be more options than you think.

Most New Jersey cities, suburbs, and even some rural areas have public transportation in the form of buses, trains, and/or trolleys. On average, people spend about $120.00 per month on public transportation. In order to figure out if this is an option in the area you live, do a quick internet search to see what kind of services are available. Many counties in NJ have their own bus services for travel to popular destinations like local shopping centers, hospitals, or larger travel hubs. If you’ve always owned a car, the number of public transportation services available in your area may surprise you.

Even if public transportation can’t get you everywhere you need to go, there are plenty of other options at your disposal. Is your community walkable? Are there bike paths? Walking or biking around town is a great way to stay active in retirement with the added bonus of being able to explore parts of your area that you would typically zoom right past while driving.

Ride sharing is also an increasingly popular way to get around. With companies like Uber and Lyft offering rides to customers for around $1-$2 per mile, these affordable options give you the convenience of a car without all the hassle and expense. Especially if you live in an area where it is difficult to pick up public transportation, ride sharing services are a great way to get around while saving money.

With the average monthly cost of a car equaling $870.00 a month and the average cost of using public transportation or ride-sharing typically around $120.00 a month, you could save about $9,000.00 a month. That’s no small savings! All that extra money can put a little more cushion in your budget, allowing you to live more comfortably. You can use that savings to do the things you’ve always wanted to do, like travel or pick up a new hobby.

Not everyone can give up their car. But owning a car is not always a necessary expense. If you can get by without a car, you can save big. Look at all of your options to decide whether or not owning a car in retirement is the right choice for you.

Affordable Housing Options for NJ Seniors

NJ seniors

With the first wave of baby boomers turning 65 in 2011, the number of senior citizens in the United States is increasing. According to the US census, by 2030 the number of people 65+ will reach nearly 71.5 million. Most seniors live on fixed incomes and sometimes retirement savings or programs like Social Security can’t support their housing expenses. Because many of these senior citizens will need affordable housing options, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) has been increasing their initiatives to help seniors manage their cost of living in retirement.

 

Reverse mortgages are an increasingly popular option for seniors who still have equity in their current home and are looking to supplement their retirement income. If you are 62+ and have paid off your mortgage or paid off a significant amount of the loan, you may be eligible for a reverse mortgage. Under a reverse mortgage, instead of making monthly payments to the lender, the lender actually makes payments to the borrower. The borrower must still make regular payments on property taxes and homeowners insurance. This allows retirees to use the wealth they have accumulated in their homes to help cover their cost of living.

 

There are, however, a lot of reverse mortgage scams to watch out for. Some companies will outright lie to sell their services to unsuspecting and desperate seniors. The only reverse mortgage insured by the U.S. Federal Government is the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage (HECM). Through the HECM program, you will be able to withdraw some of your home’s equity. The amount available for withdrawal will vary from person to person and depends on the age of the youngest borrower, the current interest rate if your mortgage is not paid off, and the value of your home.

 

If you find it is impossible to stay in your current home, HUD also provides help for seniors looking to move into lower-income housing through senior housing vouchers, Section 202 supportive housing, and public housing.

 

The Housing Choice Voucher Program (HCVP) allows seniors to look for housing in the private sector amongst specific properties run by local public housing agencies including single-family homes, townhouses, and apartments. There are two kinds of vouchers: tenant-based vouchers, which move with the renter – and project-based vouchers, which are assigned to specific units and are not transferable. Typically, rent and utilities are calculated at 30% of the monthly adjusted gross income and the voucher will make up the difference in expenses. In order to find out if you or your loved one qualifies for this program, you will need to contact your local public housing agency.

 

Established in 1959, the Section 202 supportive housing program is the only HUD program specifically created to provide housing for seniors and those with disabilities. This program is designed to help seniors live as independently as possible while also offering assistance with daily living. Assistance can include dressing, bathing, housekeeping, and transportation. In this program, HUD provides loans to private and nonprofit organizations to finance the building and management of supportive housing services along with rent subsidies for residents. Typically, seniors that are 62 or older and have a very low household income (the average yearly income for Section 202 residents is $10,000/year) are eligible for this program. To apply, you will need to contact the individual housing community you are interested in.

 

Public housing for seniors includes high-rise apartments and duplexes that are operated by the local public housing agency. In this program, seniors will typically spend about 30% of their household income for rent and utilities. It is important to note that due to the limited resources available to HUD and local housing associations, there are typically long waiting lists for public housing. That is why is it important to be proactive and get in touch with your local public housing agency in order to determine your eligibility and explore all of your housing options.

 

Veitengruber Law is ready to offer expert advise on housing solutions for NJ seniors. Our goal is for you or your loved one to age in comfort and security. If you are looking for housing options for yourself or an aging parent or relative, it is important to know what resources are right for you. Call us today for your free consultation.

6 Tips for Finding a Job After Retirement

job after retirement

After retirement, many retirees find they still want to stay active and continue earning a paycheck. Additionally, more and more retirees are finding that their retirement income just doesn’t cut it. But finding a full or part-time position later in life can be difficult. The good news is today’s job market has a ton of opportunities for flexible work options perfect for retirees. Here are six helpful tips to finding a job in retirement:

 

  1. Use Your Connections

This is one of the best ways to find the kind of position you are looking for. Reach out to friends and former employers or colleagues. Think about people you know who could put a good word in for you at an organization you admire. A glowing recommendation could help you get considered for a job opening. Your friends, family, and former co-workers may know of an immediate opening or be able to point you in the direction of other opportunities.

 

  1. Downplay Your Age

You should never lie during the hiring process, but that doesn’t mean you have to make your age obvious for potential employers. Don’t list graduation dates on your resume or refer to work experience or events from several decades ago. Keep the focus on more recent accomplishments and experiences from the past 15 years. You have a lifetime of skills at your disposal. Emphasize the skills most applicable to the job you are applying for instead of focusing on the length of your work history.

 

  1. Emphasize Your Adaptability

In retirement, you will see a lot of lifestyle changes—which means your employment needs will change as well. As a retiree, you may be able to work part-time instead of full-time. Maybe it would be possible for you to work less conventional hours. You also may not need the same types of benefits as younger workers. These are all big selling points to potential employers looking for flexibility in a new hire.

 

  1. Get Comfortable With Technology

Jobs are increasingly becoming more digital and technology-based. It’s no big secret that there is a perception that older employees don’t understand technology. Don’t let potential employers pigeon hole you with that stereotype! Show off your skills with technology in your application. Be sure to know how to check e-mail, use word processing programs, and make a point to mention this in your resume or interview. If a potential employer can see you have technology skills, your application will not appear weak compared to younger candidates.

 

  1. Volunteer

It’s often easier to get a volunteer position than a paid position. Organizations are always looking for enthusiastic volunteers to help with events or work overflow. By volunteering, you can get your foot in the door at an organization that may have job openings available down the line. If you can prove to an organization that you are a hardworking and dedicated volunteer, you will be at the top of their mind when it comes time to hire for paid positions.

 

  1. Search Job Boards

AARP has job boards with full-time, part-time, seasonal, and flexible jobs specifically for retirees.  You can also check out http://www.seniorjobbank.org, http://www.Retirementjobs.com and http://www.Retiredbrains.com for more job search resources. http://www.Coolworks.com specializes in connecting people with seasonal employment and http://www.FlexJobs.com helps people find remote jobs so you can work from anywhere on your own schedule.

 

As a retiree, you can bring so many valuable skills and lived experiences to a work place. Use these tips to find the perfect job opportunity to carry you through your retirement years!

Aging in Place: Avoiding NJ Foreclosure in Retirement

NJ foreclosure

Entering retirement can be a time of celebration and relaxation, but it can also lead to financial stress. You’ve spent your whole life working towards this moment, but managing your finances on a fixed income can be hard to get used to. While ideally you would be living debt-free in retirement, many homeowners are taking their mortgages and other debts with them into their senior years. If you are worried about how to continue to pay for your home after retirement, there are some steps you can take to avoid facing a NJ foreclosure.

No matter how much you plan for retirement, one unexpected event can throw everything off balance. Unforeseen expenses are some of the biggest reasons retirees struggle to make their mortgage payments. Medical bills can quickly amount to a small fortune. Divorce can leave one person struggling to make mortgage payments alone. Loss of income can affect homeowners even after retirement, due to loss of a part-time job or loss of invested funds. If you find yourself facing even one of these hardships, it may be difficult or impossible to make a mortgage payment.

If you believe a lower monthly payment would allow you to stay in your home, you should consider a loan modification. With a loan modification, your interest rate can be lowered, the loan term can be extended, and/or the principal can be reduced to make monthly payments more affordable. In order to be eligible for a loan modification, you need to prove to your lender that you can’t afford your current mortgage payment, but could if the payment was lowered.

When applying for a loan modification, it is really helpful to have an experienced attorney advocating for your interests. When applying alone, homeowners inexperienced with the process can make mistakes or neglect to provide sufficient evidence of their income. Lenders will reject applications if they believe the requester doesn’t have enough income to meet the lower payments. However, it may just be that you have not listed all of your income, or have have failed to describe your income appropriately. Any money you are receiving has the potential to help your chances of getting approved for a loan modification. At Veitengruber Law, we know what lenders are looking for and how to create an application will be approved.

While you are working to avoid foreclosure, it might be worth looking into increasing your income. If you have the space, renting a room to a relative or friend or renting out an unused space for storage can help supplement your retirement plan. Many retirees hold part-time jobs like dog walking, babysitting, elderly care, and freelancing. Even if you only take a job long enough to get your loan modification approved and pay off some debts, you can resume a carefree retirement once the threat of foreclosure is no longer looming.

The State of New Jersey has made efforts to give retirees a better chance of maintaining their standard of living while continuing to live in the garden state. Law makers have stepped in to help struggling seniors with the Property Tax Reimbursement Plan, also known as the “Senior Freeze.” For seniors who meet a list of requirements, this program freezes property taxes at the amount paid at the time of retirement. Under this program, any increases in NJ property taxes paid since retirement will be reimbursed. This program helps struggling seniors achieve a more consistent, lower cost of living.

Your retirement years should be stress-free and happy. Veitengruber Law is experienced in offering expert legal and financial advice to carry you through retirement with financial security. Enjoy your golden years the way you should—in the comfort of your own home.

Seeking Legal Counsel When You’re Out of Money and Out of Time

nj bankruptcy attorney

 

You have reached that critical point; you can no longer keep up with your bills. You might have a mountain of credit card debt, a house going into foreclosure, a looming sheriff sale on your property, shut off notices for services, a garnishment or repossession on a vehicle, or all of the above! Perhaps you are considering bankruptcy. The point is that you need the help of a legal professional. You need it done well, you need it now, AND you need to find a way to pay for it.

 

How Can You Afford It? (How Can You Not??)

You’re going to have to spend money to save money.  HOWEVER, you’re going to save your peace of mind and hopefully some assets too.

 

  1. Take advantage of a free consultation. A qualified attorney can give you your options. Is bankruptcy right for you? Is your situation ripe for credit consolidation or negotiation? How far along are you in the foreclosure process? Is it possible to stop a pending sheriff sale? Be honest and you’ll receive realistic expectations for your individual circumstances.

 

  1. Use Your Tax Refund. Uncle Sam has been holding on to your money, but now it’s the perfect nugget of cash infusion to save you bigger money in the long run.

 

  1. Ask family and friends. It’s difficult to swallow your pride, but you never know what your support net is until you ask. If it’s a gift, then that’s great. If it’s a loan you can let your loved one know that he or she will be listed as a creditor if you file bankruptcy. For other situations; set up a plan of when and how much you can realistically repay. It’s much easier to keep your job if you have stable housing and a solid financial plan under your belt.

 

  1. Stop Paying Your Unsecured Debt. If, after your consultation, bankruptcy is in your future, stop making payments on credit cards or other unsecured debt. The total owed will be dealt with as part of the bankruptcy, so those monthly minimums can now finance your legal fund.

 

  1. Reduce your expenses and minimize outgoing expenses. Fancy coffee every morning, premium cable channels, gym membership, daily lunches “out” – all gone. It adds up fast!

 

  1. Try to earn some extra money aside from your primary occupation. Sell old electronics or find a temporary part time job. Go through your attic or basement and have a yard sale, or hit eBay. Lighten your load while filling your wallet.

 

  1. Request a payment plan. Your bankruptcy attorney may allow you to list them as a creditor in a Chapter 13 filing, thus allowing you to pay them over a period of months. Chapter 7 fees can be paid over time as well, although without the federal court supervising. (Keep in mind that you must be paid in full before your attorney will file the case.)

 

  1. Withdraw from your retirement account. Only do this as a last resort. Those funds are otherwise protected, but you could be facing a large tax consequence if you withdraw early. That being said, in some circumstances it may be the best option. Also, consider options where you essentially “borrow” the funds from yourself and replace them with a payroll reduction each pay period going forward.
    IMPORTANT NOTE: Always discuss this option with your credit repair attorney BEFORE taking any money from your retirement fund(s).

nj bankruptcy attorney

How to Find the Right Attorney

You want someone with a proven record of results who can and will act in a timely manner. You could call your local bar association or attorney referral number. You could get a referral from a friend. Or, you could count one problem solved and realize that you already know a top legal representative for all types of financial duress – Veitengruber Law.

 

Don’t represent yourself.

This isn’t small claims court, or a traffic ticket. This is your entire financial future. Your chance of successfully completing a Chapter 13 bankruptcy without legal counsel is less than 1%; the chances of completing a solo Chapter 7 is less than 50%. Besides, you might end up losing more money trying to navigate your financial issues alone than you would have spent on legal counsel in the first place.

 

You wouldn’t ask a podiatrist to work on your car, or the babysitter to fix your plumbing. You need the right person for the job – you need an expert! When you’re looking for a NJ lawyer with experience who you can trust, you need Veitengruber Law.