Surprising Factors that Influence the Value of Your NJ Home

nj home value

Many things impact a home’s value: the square footage, the lot size, the location, and the neighborhood, among many other things. But while these are the most common factors to influence home value, there are also some quite surprising factors that go into assessing the true value of a property. Here are seven unconventional factors that can impact your home’s value.

1. Privacy

In general, most homeowners desire a certain level of privacy, but not all homes offer the same level of seclusion. Neighborhood home density, proximity to neighbors, and backyard exposure all influence the perception of a home’s privacy factor. A home that is a significant distance from other properties or has a backyard that cannot be viewed by neighbors will be valued higher than a similar home located close to neighbors.

2. Frontage Length

They always say that size doesn’t matter, but when it comes to real estate, it definitely plays a part. Specifically when it comes to frontage length – the length of a home’s lot that faces the street. Not only does frontage length directly figure into the dimensions of a property, it also determines how much parking will be available to the residents. This tends to influence home values more in rural areas than suburbs.

3. Renters in the Area

There is a correlation between the number of rentals in the area and the value of a property. General opinion holds that renters don’t tend to care for a property as well as a homeowner would, thereby making the neighborhood less desirable. Because of this, lenders want to make sure there are not too many renters in the area of a property they are considering buying.

4. Proximity to Train Tracks or Airports

This one isn’t too surprising when you put it in simpler terms. It comes down to one thing: noise. Trains and planes are loud and can cause quite a disturbance throughout the day and night. Realtors know this and will often list a home at a lower price because selling near these travel hubs can be challenging.

5. Corner Lots

While this isn’t the case for all buyers, corner lots can be a turn off for some people. A property that borders two roads means there is a potential for increased (noisy) traffic, impacting the level of privacy and solitude the occupants will have. Corner lots also tend to have unusual or odd configurations that diverge from the typical square property lines.

6. History of Death in the Home

You often hear about this on tv and in movies, but the truth is that a home that has been the site of a traumatic event like a murder, suicide, or even accidental death can be negatively impacted when it comes to valuation. In fact, studies have shown that potential buyers are so turned off by these factors that a home’s value may be reduced up to 10-25%.

7. Low Scoring School Districts

Parents will relocate based entirely on the quality of a school district, so this is a very important factor. A home located in a school district with low test scores will not be valued as highly as a similar home in a district with higher test scores. The quality of the school districts in the area can also impact property taxes.

These factors don’t just influence the value of a house when you are looking to buy, but they can also affect how the value of your home changes over time. If you are looking to purchase a home, Veitengruber Law can help you connect with a realtor that knows the true value of homes in your area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Top 5 Factors That Impact NJ Real Estate Prices

new jersey real estate

Currently, the median home value in New Jersey is $342,527. If you are selling or buying a home, it is important to understand what factors go into determining a home’s value and how these factors impact list price. Here are some tips that can help you ascertain the value of your home.

1. The Big Three: Location, Product, and Timing

How well a home has been maintained and where it is located impacts the value of the home as a product. The right home in the right neighborhood can go a long way to drive up home value. Timing is harder to control. If you are selling, you want to list when the market is in your favor—but the market can change quickly.

2. Structural Integrity

Appraisers will perform a detailed physical inspection of the entire house – floor to ceiling and wall to wall. An appraisal inspection is meant to note not just superficial imperfections but also serious structural issues.

How well the home was originally constructed (and updated, if applicable), as well as the quality of the materials used, will impact an appraiser’s assessment of a home’s value. Even small details are given consideration. They will compare these details to homes in the area and adjust pricing according to specific similarities and differences.

3. Market-Driven Features

Every localized real estate market is going to have specific home features that impact the value of a home. Marble counter tops were a luxury ten years ago—they are the norm now. Consumer preferences drive expectations of required home features. If sold homes in your area boast open floor plans, gray scale interior colors, and hardwood flooring, this will set the bar for how your home will be valued.

4. Condition of the Home

Take care of any maintenance or small projects you have been avoiding. Fresh paint, manicured landscaping, and clean spaces will go a long way to showing off the full potential of your home. Make sure all the appliances you are selling with the house work and can pass inspection. You want to make sure your home looks like the most appealing home on the block.

5. Size and Appeal

Traditional layouts are big draws right now. Open floor plans and neutral color schemes are too. In matters of real estate, at least, size matters. Price per square foot is a popular search filter used by a multitude of potential buyers.

If you are a buyer, you can keep all of these factors in mind as you look for your future home. When you are trying to figure out how much you are willing to spend on a specific home, be realistic. It is common for buyers (and sellers) to think with their stomach and not with their head when it comes to estimating the value of a home. Remember that if a home appraises for under the contracted sale price, the sale could fall through. No matter how much value you personally put on a home, that value has to be backed up by the market.

If you’re ready to make a move, Veitengruber Law is ready to help you achieve your next real estate goal.

What You Need to Know About the NJ Appraisal Process

NJ appraisal

Whether you are buying or selling a home in the Garden State, you will have to go through the NJ appraisal process. If the buyer is taking out a mortgage, their lender will need to make certain financial decisions based on the results of a home appraisal. While this is a huge step in most real estate transactions, many people buying or selling a home aren’t sure what their role is in the home appraisal process. Here, we break down that process so you know exactly what a home appraisal can mean for you.

It’s true that a home inspection is intended to protect the buyer, a home appraisal is intended to protect the mortgage lender that is financing the real estate transaction. With a home appraisal, the lender in a mortgage is looking to get an objective estimate of the home’s value. They use this estimate to ensure that they are not lending more than the actual worth of the property. During a home appraisal, the appraiser is looking at everything on the entirety of the property, including: size, location, condition of internal and external home structures, any recent or necessary upgrades, and the price of comparable homes in the area. These pieces of information will provide insight into the true value of a home. From there, the appraiser will offer the lender a baseline sales figure.

In most real estate transactions, the buyer will pay for a licensed home appraiser to assess the property on behalf of the lender. The buyer will either pay at the time the appraisal takes place or add the fee to their closing costs. The lender will choose a licensed appraiser they feel will be the best judge of a home’s value, typically with a background in home construction, contracting, or home maintenance. A licensed home appraiser goes through at least 200 hours of coursework and must pass the state appraiser licensing exam before they can practice in the state of NJ.

A lender needs to be confident in the ability of the appraiser to remain objective in their appraisal, as well as their capability to back up every finding and their overall assessment of a home’s value. The appraisal report will include a drawing of the exterior, a map of the street and surrounding area, photos of the home’s exterior and street views, information on how the square footage was calculated, public tax and land records, and data surrounding area market sales. If any of these documents are missing, it can have a big impact on the home’s appraised value. If you notice any of this information missing, ask for another appraisal.

During the home appraisal process, it is common for the appraised home value to be more or less than the sale price of a property. If an appraisal is higher than the sale price for a home, this will benefit the buyer. But while the appraisal price and the listing price do not necessarily have to match, a major discrepancy in which the home is appraised for can lead to issues. As a buyer, you have a few options going forward. First, you can ask the seller to lower the sales price to match the appraisal price or pay the difference. A motivated seller may comply with this request.

If the seller does not comply, or the buyer is contractually obligated to move forward with the original sales price, there are still some things the buyer can do. If the buyer is concerned about losing their home loan, they can offer to increase the down payment. This way, the buyer is not borrowing as much money and may still be approved by the lender. The buyer could also agree to pay mortgage insurance. Borrowers who are financing more than 80% of their home purchase price will need mortgage insurance. This monthly payment would be tacked onto the regular mortgage payment and is typically .5%-1% of the total loan amount.

If the above options are not able to resolve the issue, a seller or buyer can dispute the home appraisal figure. The disputing party can work with their real estate agent or another licensed appraiser to come up with their own data. If this data diverges from the findings of the lender’s appraiser, there may be a case to correct the previous appraisal value. A lender will look at these findings and work with their own appraisal unit to come up with a new decision.

A home appraisal is an important part of any NJ real estate sale. Being knowledgeable of the process and understanding your options can save you a major headache later on. Real estate transactions are complex and the process never looks the same twice. Veitengruber Law’s experienced real estate team can help you navigate any potential problems with your appraisal, and throughout the entirety of your real estate transaction.