New Jersey Foreclosure: Frequently Asked Questions

In a New Jersey foreclosure sale, your home will be sold in an auction-type setting. The sale will be publicly announced and will be open for anyone to attend. Since New Jersey is a judicial foreclosure state, the local sheriff will typically lead the auction. If the sheriff cannot conduct your sale, another public official will do so.

Everyone who attends the foreclosure sale is able to place bids in order to buy your former home. As in all auctions, “to the highest bidder go the spoils.” The spoils in this case refers to your mortgaged home.

So: you stopped paying your mortgage payment. For a variety of reasons, people sometimes do this. Maybe you ran into temporary (or permanent) financial trouble because you: lost a job, got divorced, fell ill, made some poor money choices – the potential reasons are endless. Regardless of how you ended up in foreclosure, it’s probably not something you hoped would happen to you one day.

No one goes around saying, “I hope I get foreclosed on at least once in my lifetime!” Because foreclosure something you didn’t wish for – you probably don’t know what to expect. As a general rule, we don’t sit around thinking about things that we don’t plan to experience. Therefore, now that you have found yourself smack dab in the middle of a foreclosure, chances are that you have some questions.

We’ve covered a lot of foreclosure sub-topics here on our blog. Today’s foreclosure question we’d like to answer for you is:

“Who gets the money from the foreclosure sale?”

The normal course of a foreclosure auction is that the bidding remains rather low and the final, winning bid is often less than the house is actually worth. In fact, many times foreclosed homes are sold for less than the original mortgagor still owes the bank. There are, of course, exceptions.

Here is a breakdown of what will happen to the proceeds from your foreclosure sale, who receives payment, and in what order:

  • The first person/entity to be paid from the foreclosure sale proceeds is the New Jersey lender who granted you the loan for the mortgage in the first place. The bank or mortgage company needs to recover as much money as possible because you didn’t repay them like you originally agreed. A small portion of the proceeds will also go toward settling the cost of having the foreclosure auction.
  • If there is still money left after the sale is paid for and the lender has fully recovered the amount they are owed, any secondary lenders (2nd or 3rd mortgage granters) will receive the full amount you borrowed (perhaps for a home equity loan) or as much as possible.
  • After the above parties have received payment in full is the only time you, as the mortagor, will be entitled to receive any money from your foreclosure sale. Keep in mind: you are not likely to receive much, if any, money from a foreclosure sale because foreclosed homes don’t typically sell for as much as they would in a traditional real estate transaction.

In fact, you may even owe money when all is said and done. If the winning foreclosure bidder pays less than you still owe on the property, your lender will suffer a loss. This discrepancy is known as a deficiency balance. As the mortgagor, you can legally be held accountable for this amount.

You can learn more about NJ foreclosure procedures, get the answers to common foreclosure FAQs, and find out how a foreclosure will affect your life on our NJ law blog. We can also help you save your home via foreclosure defense, if that is your ultimate goal.

NJ Mortgage Help for Single Parents

Going through a separation and divorce is never easy, but the complication level increases when you add children to the mix. Establishing a stable family life for your kids is something every good parent strives to do, and divorce can throw a wrench into even the best laid plans.

Supporting the expenses required as a newly single parent is a daunting task as you attempt to maintain as much constancy and normalcy for your children as possible. To that end, the marital/family home is most often where divorced parents elect for their children to remain living.

With that being said, finances don’t always stretch far enough for one parent on their own to pay the mortgage on that family home, along with all other monthly expenses. If both parents are able to pitch in financially to keep the children and one parent in the home, the chances of losing the home are lower. However, the threat of foreclosure for recently divorced single parents is real, and although frightening, it is not something that will go away if you ignore it.

If you are a single parent fighting to keep the home your children have thus far grown up in, you may be overwhelmed by the responsibility of making that monthly mortgage payment on your own. Missed payments are common after significant life events like job loss, illness, death, and, you guessed it – divorce.

The bank will never throw me out since I have young children, right?

Unfortunately, too many people simply give banks and lenders a lot more credit than they deserve. Your bank does not care if you have children, an elderly parent, three sick dogs and a chronic illness – their bottom line is money. You may think, “But there are people working at that bank; surely there is someone there with enough empathy to see that I am struggling.”

While that may be true – of course there are kind people working in banks and lending institutions – they must follow the instructions they are given by their superiors. A mortgage loan that is not being paid on time or at all WILL be sent into foreclosure by the lender. The question is not “If” but “When.”

How can I keep the bank from foreclosing? I just need a little more time!

The best move you can make if you’re in a similar situation is to take action before your home is foreclosed upon by your lender. You may qualify for a loan modification or refinancing. A New Jersey foreclosure and bankruptcy attorney should be the next person you call. Not many attorneys specialize in both areas, so it is important that you work to find a certified NJ attorney who has the experience you need.

Why do I need a bankruptcy attorney? I’m not broke and I want to keep my home.

An experienced NJ attorney who handles both foreclosure defense and bankruptcy matters will be able to stall your foreclosure by using the Automatic Stay. This tactic can only be utilized if the debtor files for bankruptcy.

Even if filing for bankruptcy was not on your top ten list of things to accomplish in life, it is a means to an end that has helped a multitude of people in your exact situation before.

 

Image: “Mother’s Moment” by Leonid Mamchenkov – licensed under CC 2.0

Do You Understand Your Mortgage’s Fine Print?

Now that the housing/mortgage crisis has begun to level out in most parts of the country, it has once again become a buyer’s market, and this time in a much more reasonable manner. Interest rates are good, but not unbelievably good like they were leading up to the 2007 crisis. As we all know by now: if something seems too good to be true, it probably is.

Just because we’re looking at the US Financial Crisis (2007-2008) in the rear view mirror doesn’t mean that getting a mortgage loan today comes without risks, though. In fact, there is a lot to be learned from the mistakes made a decade ago.

In order to ensure that you aren’t getting yourself into something you can’t handle or something that will change over time (and not in your favor) – you simply MUST have a complete and solid understanding of everything contained in your mortgage agreement.

To most people, this probably sounds like common sense. But have you ever looked at a real, live mortgage agreement? They are very lengthy with a lot of industry jargon that can quickly spin you into a confused puddle on the floor.

Your best bet is to find a New Jersey lawyer with real estate knowledge. Make sure you trust him and his team implicitly – in all likelihood a paralegal may also work with you on real estate matters, so be sure to meet everyone in the office who will be helping you understand your documents.

Questions to have ready for your attorney and/or paralegal include:

  • Is my rate variable or fixed? If the answer is variable, find out the lowest fixed rate that you’ll be able to lock in your loan.
  • Will there be penalties if I have to break my mortgage contract?
  • Am I required to pay mortgage insurance? If so, find out why. You may be able to work with a different lender who will not require mortgage insurance. If mortgage insurance is non-negotiable, be sure to ask how long you’ll be paying it, because it can often be a significant sum.
  • How long does my mortgage loan last? Will different terms lower my monthly payment?
  • What fees am I required to pay up front and are there any fees that were tossed into the total loan amount?
  • Do I have a balloon payment clause?
  • What are mortgage “points?”
  • Is a down payment required?
  • What is my monthly payment?
  • What is my credit score? We left this question until the end for a reason. We wanted to leave you with it on your mind. Finding out your credit score should be one of the first things you do even before you begin applying for mortgage pre-approval.

Your credit score will have a significant impact on the interest rate you will be offered by lenders. If your score is less than desirable, or even “fair”, talk to your NJ real estate attorney and paralegal about waiting to buy a home until you can boost your score into the “good” or “excellent” range. Work with your trusted legal team to raise your credit score. They will also be able to guide you in determining the best time to jump into the real estate market so that you qualify for the best loan options. This will save you a lot of money throughout the length of your mortgage.

 

 

Images: “Chocolates 1” and “Chocolates 2” by Windell Oskay – licensed under CC 2.0

Can I Receive Hurricane Sandy Forbearance if I Filed for Bankruptcy?

Homeowners in New Jersey and all along the Atlantic coast will be hard-pressed to ever forget Hurricane Sandy – a deadly “superstorm” that hit the eastern seaboard in October of 2012. Assessed as the second-costliest hurricane to ever hit the United States, estimates of Sandy’s damage (in the US alone) are approximately $72 billion. The only hurricane in US history to cause more damage was Hurricane Katrina.

New York and New Jersey were the hardest hit states, with gale force winds that reached 90 mph and heavy rain (up to 12 inches in some locations) which led to flooding and significant structural damage of homes, businesses, beaches, boardwalks, roads, and more. Power outages were widespread and lasted for weeks in some places. For the first time since 1888, the New York Stock Exchange closed (on October 29 and 30) due to weather. Even Halloween was postponed in New Jersey, much to the chagrin of kids across the state.

As we hyper-focus on the damage done by Hurricane Sandy to New Jersey alone, we know that nearly 400,000 homes suffered damage from the storm, many were without power for an extended period of time, and 37 people died.

Relief efforts to clean up and rebuild the damaged areas of New Jersey were impressive, and some (but not enough) federal aid monies were approved for the state. Some of that federal aid was disbursed extremely slowly which means the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy is still felt today, nearly five years after the storm.

Residents along the New Jersey shore sustained the most damage – both from flooding and high winds – to their homes and properties. The fact that five years has passed should mean that everyone in NJ has recovered from the storm; unfortunately that just isn’t the case. Although many people and organizations dedicated extraordinary man hours and donations toward the recovery effort, there are homeowners who still remain displaced and/or are facing foreclosure.

The good news is that Governor Christie recently signed a bill (S-2300, A-333) that will potentially offer some much needed help to those who are still struggling post-Sandy. The bill specifically grants Sandy victims with a mortgage forbearance period of up to three years. In order to receive the forbearance, homeowners must have been approved for help via the Reconstruction, Rehabilitation, Elevation and Mitigation Program OR the Low-to-Moderate Income Program.

Affected NJ homeowners struggled for years trying to rebuild their homes after Sandy. Without enough funds to make their homes habitable again, a multitude of these residents had to rent alternative housing. Paying rent while still paying the mortgage on their now damaged property pushed many homeowners into bankruptcy.

Many homeowners filed for the protection offered by the Automatic Stay in the hopes that funding would be released before their bankruptcy case was finalized. Not realizing how long it would take for federal relief funds to be released, their bankruptcy cases ended long ago, and many of the homeowners chose not to reaffirm their mortgages.

Now that bill S-2300, A-333 has been signed, those who filed for bankruptcy and didn’t reaffirm their mortgages are wondering if they still qualify for forbearance. The good news is that a lender may not require that a mortgage be reaffirmed in order for the mortgage holder to receive forbearance.

Homeowners who’ve filed for bankruptcy without reaffirming their mortgages may have to provide their lender with a letter acknowledging that the mortgage debt was discharged in bankruptcy. This protects lenders/creditors from worrying that they’ll be sued when they try to collect on the debt again.

It’s very possible that lenders will not feel comfortable discussing the matter directly with the homeowner. They don’t want to seem as though they are breaking bankruptcy law by attempting to collect on a discharged debt. In this case, borrowers should work with a bankruptcy or foreclosure attorney in New Jersey to negotiate with their lender on their behalf.

 

Image: “Crooked House” by Don McCullough – licensed under CC by 2.0

Multi-Generational Living Arrangements & Home Ownership Rights

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Today’s modern families are ever-shifting in a multitude of directions, some of which were made possible by the evolution of our nation’s legal system. Still other present-day families form when an adult “child” returns to live at home after attending college, job loss, divorce, or simply by choice. Additionally, many older parents live with a daughter or son and their family in order to cut costs and to share child-rearing duties of the next generation.

Regardless of the reason, the changing structure of the typical American family can raise some questions about ownership of the family home. When other adults outside of the original home owner live together, what are their rights if that homeowner passes away?

Example: Single mom Nicole and her mother decide the best course of action after Nicole’s divorce is for the two of them to move in together. Nicole’s husband kept the marital home, so Nicole and her two children move into her mother’s more-than-ample house. As Nicole’s father passed away several years ago, this decision will allow companionship for Nicole’s mother, and will relieve the financial burden on both women.

Something important for Nicole and her mother to think about is what will happen to the home when Nicole’s mom passes away? Assuming the current living situation continues until such a time, what will Nicole’s rights be?

In New Jersey, Nicole and her mother can modify the home mortgage paperwork to include special language that will protect Nicole and her children from losing the home upon the death of her mom. The deed to the home must say that Nicole and her mother are joint tenants with right of survivorship.

Joint tenancy means that both parties named own the property equally, and upon the death of one of them, the deed to the home will automatically transfer to the other, superseding anything that is stated in the decedent’s will.

If Nicole’s mother had previously created a will indicating that upon her death, her home should be divided equally between all three of her children (Nicole and her two siblings), as long as the proper language was added onto the title documentation, Nicole should have no problem being granted full ownership of the home.

While in theory this is a relatively simple concept, it must be handled with the utmost seriousness and attention to detail.  As has happened in the past, if the joint tenancy language is not used precisely as required, legal disputes can and likely will arise.

Do you have questions about your rights to real property that you shared with another family member or unrelated roommate who has now passed away? If you were not joint tenants, you may still have some recourse, but you will have to act swiftly and with the aid of a very experienced NJ estate planning/real estate attorney.

If you’re currently in a situation like Nicole’s, be proactive and make sure that your living arrangements are solidified for the future by taking title of the home in joint tenancy.

Image credit: Bryan Anthony

Can a NJ Lender Foreclose for Late Payments Only?

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Like millions of Americans who own their own homes, your largest monthly bill is most certainly your mortgage payment. This is especially true if you’ve wrapped your property taxes in with your mortgage loan. Paying your mortgage each month can feel physically painful at times, especially if you have to write out all of those numbers on a paper check. OUCH.

Nonetheless, you obviously knew what you signed up for when you applied for your current mortgage, so its appearance each month doesn’t necessarily come as a surprise. Why, then, are so many Americans habitually late in paying for this particular loan?

The answer to that is simple. A large percentage of homeowners in this country are living paycheck to paycheck – earning just enough money every month to fulfill their financial obligations. This leads to tense moments when there simply aren’t sufficient funds in the bank to make the huge mortgage payment without fear of bouncing a check.

Nobody wants to bounce a check – we all know that. The hassle combined with added fees from your bank AND your lender mean that bouncing a check is an extremely costly mistake. Instead of potentially writing a check that can’t be cashed, many homeowners simply wait until their bank account has enough money to fulfill the mortgage payment. Sometimes this means the mortgage payment gets sent in a few days (or weeks) late.

The question here, is: Can a lender foreclose on a homeowner if they are chronically late with their mortgage payment? To clarify, we’re talking about a borrower who hasn’t actually missed any payments and technically isn’t “behind” on their mortgage – only slightly late with nearly every payment.

The short answer is that almost no lender will move toward foreclosure if the borrower isn’t actually behind on payments. That’s not to say it has never happened, but if it has, it’s exceedingly rare. In most cases, lenders don’t send out ‘Intent to Foreclose’ notices until a borrower has missed 3 full mortgage payments. Some lenders will threaten foreclosure after one missed payment, but as long as you can bring the mortgage current, they back down.

What can happen to you if you consistently pay your mortgage (or any other monthly bills) late is that your credit score can drop. Even though you may avoid foreclosure, late payments are often reported to credit reporting agencies, and each late payment will ding your score a few points. If you’re late every month for a year, your score may have dropped over 100 points.

If you’re currently struggling to pay your mortgage in a timely manner, there are some things you can do. First, check your credit score to see how much damage you’ve done. That gives you a good starting point. Next, get in touch with your lender and tell them why you’re having trouble paying on time. You may benefit from changing the time of month that your payments are due, paying online, or paying via telephone when your bank account is primed and ready.

If none of the above options is enough to alleviate your tardiness, you may benefit from applying for a NJ loan modification. You can apply for one on your own, but many times a real estate attorney can negotiate with your lender much more effectively, working to extend the life of the loan, reduce the principal amount due, erase late fees, and maybe even lower the interest rate on the loan. One or a combination of these modifications can make paying your mortgage on time much more manageable.

 

Image credit: John Lloyd

Second Mortgages After Foreclosure: Who Pays?

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What is a second mortgage?

Oftentimes, when applying for a home loan, first time home buyers don’t have enough money to make a substantial down payment. Typically, lenders don’t like to grant loans for more than 80% of the price of a home. Lending so much money to a borrower is risky, so banks who do so will require that the buyers purchase private mortgage insurance (PMI). Mortgage insurance is expensive, so borrowers try to avoid it by applying for two separate mortgage loans. The first loan granted is usually for a maximum of 80% of the purchase price, while the second mortgage covers the remaining cost of the home – typically around 20%.

Who can get a second mortgage?

In order to be approved for a second mortgage (also referred to as an 80/20 loan), you must have a very good credit rating. Because you won’t be making any down payment, you are a higher risk to your lenders. A high credit score (above 700) puts lenders at ease, knowing that you have a solid credit history.

What happens to a second mortgage after foreclosure?

Even well-qualified buyers can experience foreclosure. As they say, “Life happens,” and a variety of factors may cause you to become unable to continue making your monthly mortgage payments even if you had great credit when you bought your home. For example, you may have experienced:

  • Divorce
  • Chronic illness
  • Accident or injury that permanently reduced your earning potential
  • Job loss
  • Unforeseen expenses (death or disability of a close relative, job transfer, etc)

Upon foreclosure of your home, your primary mortgage lender (80%) will sell your home at Sheriff’s Sale/Foreclosure Sale in order to recoup at least some of the money you borrowed but were unable to repay. Any sale proceeds that exceed what you owed your primary lender will be used to pay back your second mortgage lender.

Home sold at foreclosure sale almost always sell for less than they are worth. This means that second mortgage lenders often don’t see any proceeds from foreclosure sales. The second lender is left holding the (empty) bag, as the saying goes.

Will I have to repay the second mortgage if the foreclosure sale price is below market value?

Naturally, this is a pressing question for homeowners who’ve lost their homes to foreclosure. No one decides to go through foreclosure because they have plenty of money floating around. If you’ve lost a home to foreclosure, you’re understandably concerned about the potential of a deficiency judgment.

A deficiency judgment is a legal action that a lender can take against you for the amount of money they lost when your home was sold at Sheriff’s Sale. Many lenders will write off the loss due to the cost and hassle of mounting a legal action. However, some lenders do indeed pursue a lawsuit against defaulted borrowers whose homes were sold at foreclosure for less than the amount still owed.

How can I repay my second mortgage? I’m already in financial distress!

If your second mortgage lender has threatened you with legal action unless you pay up, you need to be proactive by retaining counsel. You can file for bankruptcy, which will automatically prohibit ALL of your creditors from attempting to collect money from you. Your NJ bankruptcy attorney can also take other action to settle your second mortgage debt if you wish to avoid chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Image credit: Chris Potter

Bankruptcy After Divorce: Can Property Settlements be Discharged?

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Couples who are going through a separation or divorce learn very quickly how expensive it is to split up a marriage. Firstly, the added costs of simply living in two different residences add up fast. In addition to separate living costs comes child support, alimony, equitable distribution, potential attorney fees (times 2), loss of part of your pension, and more.

In divorces where one spouse remains living in the marital home, they may be saddled with an order to pay their ex-spouse up to half of the equity in the home (if there is any). If this order comes as a surprise, paying it may be nigh on impossible, especially if it’s a substantial amount of money.

Some divorcing homeowners may wonder if they can discharge the home equity money they owe to their ex-spouse in a chapter 7 bankruptcy case. For example, if the party remaining in the home is ordered to pay $30,000 for equity in the home, would a chapter 7 bankruptcy erase that debt?

The answer to that question is no. Property settlements cannot be discharged in a chapter 7 bankruptcy, although any and all debts owed relating to the marriage (except for child support and alimony) must be listed in any bankruptcy filing. Any monies that you were ordered to pay to your ex for their portion of the equity in the home are not dischargeable in a NJ chapter 7 case. Filing for chapter 7 bankruptcy can help eliminate a number of other debts owed, excluding any debts owed as per the Property Settlement Agreement/Divorce Decree.

With that being said, there is another option for divorcing homeowners who are struggling financially and simply do not have the means to pay their ex-spouse’s  portion of the equity in the home.

In fact, filing for chapter 13 if you are struggling to stay financially afloat after a divorce can be a solution to a number of your money woes. As mentioned, shifting to a one-income household can be a challenging adjustment, especially if you make less money than your spouse does.

If you have fallen behind on any utility bills, property taxes, HOA fees or if you have rapidly rising credit card debt in NJ, chapter 13 will help you reorganize all of your debts, giving you as much as 5 years to get caught up. This includes mortgage debt – and filing for chapter 13 will protect your home from foreclosure.

Along with helping you reorganize your debts, the sum you’ve been ordered to pay your ex-spouse can be reduced or discharged entirely. The possibility of this is dependent upon your income and the combined total of all of your debts. The amount you’ll be required to pay toward divorce debts that are not support-related will be based on how much you can afford to pay. Beyond what you can afford within the given time frame of your chapter 13 repayment period, the rest of your non-support divorce debts will often be discharged, and you will no longer owe the remaining amount.

↓↓CRUCIAL INFORMATION BELOW↓↓

The experience of your bankruptcy attorney is of the utmost importance in a matter involving NJ bankruptcy after divorce. There are so many variables that will affect all aspects of your chapter 13 bankruptcy case. An inexperienced attorney can make expensive and disastrous mistakes. Look for a NJ bankruptcy lawyer who focuses their practice on helping people improve their financial future through debt relief and credit counseling.

Image credit: Fried Dough (flickr user)

Should I Sell My Home to Pay off Credit Card Debt?

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If you’re dying to get out from under a heavy debt load, you may feel like you’ve tried every “trick” in the book to pay back what you owe. You may have already either considered or attempted one or many of the following:

Veitengruber Law does not recommend all of the above actions, as you can well imagine. Click on each item in the list for more information.

While we can’t tell you in this article which changes will be most successful in reducing your unique debt load, we do feel that many of the above actions are smart decisions for someone working to get out of debt.

Another effective way to put more money toward paying off your debts is to sell everything you possibly can. Any personal property you own that doesn’t have significant sentimental value can be turned into profit you can use to pay your creditors.

Should you sell your home to pay off debt?

If you have already filed for bankruptcy or if your house has been foreclosed upon, selling your home may not be a good option for you. However, we make it a rule to ‘never say never,’ so anything’s possible until your home has been sold at sheriff’s sale.

For homeowners who have such large mortgage payments that there is no money left over each month, selling is recommended. In fact, if your mortgage payment equals more than 25% of your monthly income (after taxes), you honestly can’t afford your house and should downsize ASAP.

By downsizing your home (buying a home that costs less than your current home), you’ll also be downsizing your housing budget, allowing you to put more of your paycheck toward the debts that are dragging you and your credit score down.

If you have equity in your home when it sells, you can take a portion (or all) of that windfall to put toward your debts. Even if you won’t make a profit from the sale of your home, having a less expensive mortgage payment should be incentive enough to sell your current home and buy something that won’t eat up all of your take home pay.

Selling your home is even an option if you wouldn’t be able to afford a down payment on a smaller, less expensive home. Although renting an apartment may seem like moving in the wrong direction, the money saved every month can be substantial – and it can all (or mostly) go toward eliminating your debt.

After you have successfully paid off your debts, you can then reevaluate your housing situation. You may find that you didn’t need the bigger house after all! If, however, you’ve been crammed into a small space that isn’t working for your family, you’ll be able to afford a larger housing payment without your other debts looming over you.

Talk to your local debt relief experts today about reducing your debts and whether or not selling your home is a smart option for you.

 

Image credit: Images of Money

Can a Commercial Lease Survive a Residential Foreclosure?

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Aside from home-based businesses, there are many companies (typically small businesses) that have office(s) located in a residential building. The residential property in question may be a single family home, condominium, apartment, or townhome whose owner is paying a mortgage loan and renting the property out to the business owner.

A question arises if and when the residential property in question enters foreclosure. What is to become of the commercial lease and the company owner who is running a business at the location?

Can a business be evicted due to a residential foreclosure?

Unfortunately, commercial leases differ quite dramatically in comparison with residential leases. The most significant difference is that there are far fewer consumer protection laws in place to protect commercial lessees compared to residential lessees.

A company doing business in a residential building (that is, of course, zoned for permission to operate a business) will have entered into a commercial lease with the building’s owner, who then effectively becomes the company’s landlord. If the landlord falls behind on paying the mortgage and the property is foreclosed upon, what will happen to the business owner and his employees who work in the building? Will they be evicted or do they have the right to stay on after the foreclosure sale with the bank essentially becoming their new landlord?

There are two distinct possibilities that can result in eviction of the business owner:

  1. If the commercial lessee (tenant/business owner) was made aware of (and a party to) the impending foreclosure, and the lease was created before the property owner defaulted on the mortgage, the lender has the right to evict the commercial tenants, but they must obtain a court order to do so.
  2. Any lease that originated after the property owner had already defaulted on the mortgage becomes null and void on the official foreclosure date. No court order is necessary for eviction of the commercial lessees.

Because of the above two scenarios, commercial tenants must advocate for themselves when they are signing a lease. Specifically, commercial renters should scrutinize something called the SNDA (Subordination, Non-disturbance and Attornment) provisions that exist within nearly every commercial lease.

How can SNDA provisions save me from having to uproot my business?

Subordination, non-disturbance and attornment provisions are included in commercial leases specifically to protect commercial renters in the event of a foreclosure on the property. Unfortunately, many commercial tenants have a tendency to “skim” the SNDA sections of their rental agreement due to their excessive length and confusing legal jargon.

Despite the investment of time, commercial tenants should always certify that their lease agreement contains favorable SNDA provisions – specifically the Non-disturbance Provision. Although negotiating a Non-disturbance agreement that both parties agree with can take several months, in the end it will leave the renter protected against eviction in the event of default by the landlord on the mortgage.

If you are a business owner renting a commercial space in a residential building that’s in foreclosure, find out what rights you have by consulting with a real estate attorney in New Jersey. Conversely, business owners just beginning the process of locating rental space should do the same to ensure that your business location will be safe in the event of foreclosure.

If you want to learn more about commercial leases in relation to residential foreclosures, call Veitengruber Law for your free consultation meeting with one of our experienced real estate and foreclosure attorneys. We now have offices in Wall, Bordentown and Marlton, NJ. Visit our website to learn more about how we can help you.

Image credit: Dan Nguyen