What Does the Recent Tax Reform Mean for the NJ Real Estate Market?

It is not a “Happy New Year” for New Jersey residents and prospective homeowners when it comes to the new tax plan that was unveiled at the White House last week. Essentially, a tax increase is the way these homeowners are starting 2018, as the cap on state and local tax deductions is now $10,000. Not only did taxes go up, but the state housing market is also affected.

New Jersey residents pay one of the highest tax rates in the federal government but experience one of the lowest returns of federal spending of any state. At the center of the first federal tax code reform in 31 years is a steep corporate tax cut that proponents of the legislation hope will unleash the nations’ economy. Of course, to make up for dramatic corporate tax cuts, deductions are placed under the microscope. Unfortunately, some of these targeted deductions have been particularly beneficial to New Jersey residents in the past.

If a current or prospective homeowner was paying $10,000 with pre-tax dollars and they’re now paying $14,000, in reality they will have to pay about $5,000 to pay the additional difference of $4,000. Fourteen thousand dollars in real estate taxes doesn’t compare with the top 5 New Jersey towns when it comes to their 2016 Average Residential Tax Bill. The municipality of Tavistock comes in at number one with the 2016 average bill at $31,132.

As a current homeowner, you may wonder how this will affect your property value. The landscape doesn’t look very green. Nobody knows for sure; as real estate markets are affected by more variables than just real estate taxes. The most affected consumer lives in 1 of 7 New Jersey counties that make up the top 10 in the United States. These are the consumers who will lose the most in home prices across the nation.  At the top of the Average House Price Decline list is Essex County which will take a hit of 10.5%.

Some grim scenarios propose that high-income residents would migrate to other states, a slowdown in home sales would affect contractors and home building businesses and stores, and the already high-taxed state would see even higher taxes.

As mentioned before, there are many factors that enter into the real estate market and New Jersey realtors must continue to sell the same way even with the uncertainty created by the new tax plan. With a low-inventory market or, in other words, when there are more buyers than sellers, and when you write off your full real estate tax amount, the real estate market is much more stable. It has been considered a sellers’ market for some time now with sellers getting considerably more than just their asking price in many cases. Eager buyers may now delay making a move from renting to buying or purchasing a bigger home for their growing family. Those who invest in real estate and current landlords will be able to pass along these tax increases to their tenants.

Normally, if the economy holds steady, the real estate market follows suit or self-corrects. Of course, the true impact won’t be known until spring has sprung and the real estate market begins to bloom.

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How to Sell Your Home Before Your Lender Forecloses

nj bankruptcy attorney

Many times here on our bankruptcy blog, we describe situations where homeowners want to save their homes. Filing for bankruptcy sets the Automatic Stay into motion, which in turn prevents a home from being foreclosed upon. The length of the bankruptcy case and the anticipated outcome of a discharge of debts allows those homeowners (who desire it) the ability to adjust their debt-to-income ratio enough to keep their home via reaffirmation.

However, sometimes, a financially distressed homeowner doesn’t want to save their home. They may wish to downsize or move into a more affordable geographical location. Foreclosure, then, is not their ideal outcome, because they’ll end up with no money from the sale of the home, their credit scores will drop, and they could end up owing a deficiency judgment.

In these situations, selling the home is the desired outcome.

What’s the problem, then? Just sell the house and get on with things, right? The dilemma arises when homeowners have fallen behind on their mortgage payments and their lender is threatening to foreclose before they have a chance to get the house listed on the market.

If you do not want to keep your current house, but you’re simply short on time due to the immediate threat of foreclosure and sheriff’s sale, you’re in luck. You came to the right place, because we can help gain you enough time to get your property sold to a proper buyer rather than through a foreclosure bidding auction.

Why not just let your home go to foreclosure sale? A sale’s a sale, right?

Actually, no. Very, very much NO. However, many homeowners who’ve found themselves face-to-face with a foreclosure don’t realize they can take action toward an end goal of selling their home even when the home is actively being foreclosed upon. That’s right – this is possible even if you’re behind on your mortgage payments – or not making them at all.

Homes that sell via foreclosure auction or “sheriff’s sale” (find out why it’s called that here) almost always sell for significantly less than their real time market value. That is the #1 reason that you should consider trying to list your home for sale before sheriff’s sale.

For those homeowners who know they cannot continue living and maintaining their current lifestyle (i.e. high mortgage payments and property taxes), the last thing needed is the possibility of a deficiency judgement.

A deficiency judgement isn’t the only reason to avoid foreclosure.

By beating your lender to the punch and selling your home before they have a chance to pull the rug out from under you, you gain the opportunity for a substantially higher sale price. This will guarantee that all of your missed payments, late fees and interest is paid back to your lender, causing a domino effect of good results:

  1. Your foreclosure will be dismissed.
  2. You may end up with some equity in your pocket.
  3. Other dischargeable debts can be eliminated or greatly reduced.

Filing for bankruptcy in New Jersey should be viewed as a valuable tool that can be used to right a financial situation gone awry. The key to getting all of your ducks in a row, however, is working with the right NJ bankruptcy attorney. Timing is everything; don’t delay making a move on what can potentially turn into a disaster. Take action now, and you can walk right into a story with a happy ending.

 

NJ Foreclosure Sale: What is an Arm’s Length Transaction?

When a piece of real property is scheduled for NJ foreclosure sale (also known as and commonly referred to as the Sheriff’s Sale), an interested buyer, investor or “house hunter” may reach out directly to the homeowner. Even when a homeowner’s property is in foreclosure with the Sheriff’s Sale scheduled, they (the owner) have the legal right to attempt to sell the home.

A home that is in NJ foreclosure is likely to sell at Sheriff’s Sale for substantially less than its real value. This can end with the original homeowner owing the lender the difference between how much they still owed on their mortgage loan and the foreclosure sale price. This is called a deficiency, and although lenders do not always pursue a deficiency judgement from the court, sellers should know that it is always a possibility.

Armed with information about a potential deficiency judgement, a homeowner going through the foreclosure process is smart to attempt to find a buyer before the Sheriff’s Sale date. In fact, should the homeowner find an “arm’s length” buyer prior to the foreclosure sale, it’s good news all around. The lender doesn’t have to move forward with their sale, which saves them time and money, and of course, the original homeowner may very well receive a better offer outside of a Sheriff’s Sale. Lastly, the new buyer can feel good about purchasing a foreclosure property before it is up for public sale, eliminating the competition.

What is an Arm’s Length Transaction?

When a homeowner’s lender moves forward with foreclosure, the homeowner still retains ownership and the ability to sell the property before the Sheriff’s Sale, but there are several stipulations in order to guarantee that a seller in this situation can only sell to a party who is considered an Arm’s Length buyer.

For a transaction like this to be considered fair, New Jersey real estate laws state that both the buyer and the seller must not be in any kind of relationship that is closer than “arm’s length.” The following are examples of relationships that are not arm’s length, and therefore would not be ideal buyers before the Sheriff’s Sale:

  • Family members
  • Close friends
  • Employer/employee
  • Parent company/subsidiary
  • Trust/beneficiary

As long as the homeowner is negotiating with someone who is not acting in the homeowner’s best interest (for example, a parent buying the home below market value only to allow their child, the seller, to keep living there), the end result of a transaction prior to foreclosure sale is typically a good idea.

An Arm’s Length Transaction must involve two parties who are independently acting for their own self-interest. Also, the best and fairest deal that is close to the home’s market value should ultimately be the goal of this type of transaction.

Is it Illegal to Participate in a Non-Arm’s Length Transaction?

While it is not necessarily illegal to sell to a non-arm’s length buyer, when a homeowner is already immersed in the foreclosure process, it is advisable to follow the recommendations of an experienced NJ foreclosure/real estate attorney. Ask your attorney to hook you up with a reputable tax professional as well, because transferring property to a non-arm’s length buyer comes with additional tax implications.

Learn more about your rights during foreclosure!

 

Can I “Cramdown” my Mortgage in a NJ Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

While it may invoke images of a young parent’s attempt to eat dinner in between meeting the constant needs of a new baby, the term “cramdown” actually has nothing to do with food (at least in our context).

Debtors who file for a chapter 13 bankruptcy have determined that they can no longer stay above water paying their monthly expenses for their current lifestyle. Chapter 13 applicants typically have a dependable job with a decent income, and they are able to pay back at least a portion of the money they owe to creditors.

During NJ chapter 13 bankruptcy proceedings, a reconfigured payment plan will be laid out for the debtor that will allow them to avoid losing valuable assets. A home loan modification and a reorganization of other unsecured debts may also be part of a chapter 13 plan.

What exactly is a “cramdown?”

Another very effective strategy employed in many chapter 13 reorganization plan is called a “cramdown.” In order for a debtor to “cram” a loan down, it must be a personal property loan, like a loan for a car, home furnishings or appliances, or investment property. An important restriction here is that, unfortunately, mortgages on principle residences cannot be crammed down.

Here’s how it works:

Let’s make it easy and use a car loan as an example. These types of loans are often crammed down in chapter 13 cases due to the rapid depreciation of all vehicles immediately upon being purchased.

If a debtor borrowed $30,000 to buy a car a number of years ago, and today still owes $20,000 on that loan, it’s important to learn the current market value of the car. Let’s say the vehicle is only “worth” $15,000 now (we’re using easy figures for this example – your numbers may vary). Even though the debtor technically owes $20,000 to the creditor, a chapter 13 allows them to cram that balance down to the amount the car is actually worth. In this case, the debtor will benefit from a reduction of his loan balance by $5,000, only owing the current value of the vehicle, or $15,000.

This same process can be applied to other personal property loans that are currently upside down. To be upside down on a loan means that a debtor owes more than the property is currently worth. The cramdown strategy can only be used during a chapter 13 bankruptcy.

The amount “left over” when a loan is crammed down in a chapter 13 will be treated like the rest of the debtor’s unsecured debts, which include loans for things that are not physical property. A portion of a debtor’s total unsecured debts can be discharged, but only after they have completed their chapter 13 payment plan (which is usually spread out over 3-5 years).

The most common types of unsecured debts in New Jersey today are credit card debt and medical debt. Other examples include personal loans, student loans, alimony arrears and child support arrears. Not all debt is dischargeable in bankruptcy. Discuss your specific debt with your bankruptcy attorney.

In addition to the lump sum reduction in the amount due on a loan, a chapter 13 bankruptcy cramdown allows many debtors to reduce the interest rate they are currently paying on some (or all) of their personal property loans.

There are other benefits to a loan cramdown as well as some limitations and timelines that must be closely adhered to. Talk to your New Jersey bankruptcy attorney to learn more, and to find out of a chapter 13 bankruptcy could be the answer you’ve been seeking.

What to Expect When You’re Expecting to Close

Now that you’ve invested extensive time and energy into the process of buying a home in NJ, it can feel a bit overwhelming to realize that you still have one hurdle to clear – the closing. Most people have at least a vague, general knowledge of the fact that you have to “close” on a property before it officially becomes yours. But what exactly does this mysterious “closing” entail?

The How (to prepare):

To ensure that your closing (or settlement, as it is often called) goes smoothly, it’s best to be fully prepared in advance. Because contract language can be confusing and lengthy, it is in your best interest to have an experienced New Jersey real estate attorney review all of your loan statements and the purchase contract during your three day attorney review period, which is required by law to begin within three business days of your official closing date.

Along with having your attorney carefully review all of your paperwork, you should be allowed to do a last walk-through of the home 24 hours before the closing. This walk-through has two main purposes: to ensure that everything is in the condition that the seller agreed to in the contract, and to make sure that the seller has fully and completely vacated the premises (unless it has been otherwise negotiated in the contract).

The Who:

State laws dictate who must be present at a real estate closing. In New Jersey, the buyer(s) must be present to sign all of the official paperwork and final loan documents. The buyer’s attorney can be present if there are any questions still left unanswered, but your NJ real estate attorney is not required to attend the closing. Your real estate agent and/or title company representative will typically handle all of the closing details.

Other people who may attend the closing include: the seller, the seller’s real estate agent and occasionally, a representative from your lending institution.

The Where:

New Jersey real estate closings most often take place at the buyer’s attorney’s office or at the buyer’s realtor’s office. The location is negotiable so that it is as accommodating as possible for everyone involved.

The What (to bring):

On the day of your closing, you’ll to bring proof of your identity, proof of your homeowners insurance policy, any home inspection reports and a copy of the contract that you have reviewed with your attorney. You’ll need this copy to verify that no changes have been made to the official contract that you will be signing.

This is also the time to fork over your down payment and closing costs. You cannot make these payments with a personal check, so be sure to verify with your closing agent beforehand what form of payment is preferred. It will likely be a cashier’s check or, in some cases, a wire transfer. If there are any smaller surprise fees that need to be paid at closing, you should be able to pay for those with a check.

The What (to expect):

Once you arrive at your closing or settlement meeting, you can expect to do a lot (and we mean A LOT) of signing your name on all of the closing documents and final loan paperwork.

The transaction will be recorded by a representative from the title company, who will then file the deed with the appropriate township/municipality.

Just as your hand starts to cramp uncontrollably from all of the signing you have to do, it will be over and you’ll be handed the keys to your new NJ home!

 

 

 

 

Hiring the Right Professionals for Your NJ Real Estate Purchase

When it comes time to purchase a home, whether you’re a first-time home buyer or an experienced home buyer, you want to put together a superior professional team. In doing so, you will give yourself the best chance at landing the home of your dreams within your price range and ideally, within your desired timeframe.

Living in the technology era makes it extraordinarily easy to access information regarding almost any topic – and this includes the real estate market. While any tech savvy home buyer can access a home’s stats, asking price and any other information associated with the listing, does this mean that you don’t need to hire a realtor? And while were at it, who else do you need to hire help you bring this thing “home?”

Real estate professional/agent

While it’s true that you can easily access listing information about virtually any property that is listed on the MLS (Multiple Listing Service), it is imperative that you take the time to research, interview and select the right real estate agent.

Real estate agents have so much more to offer you than what you can find with the click of your computer mouse, namely: experience. The right real estate agent for you will become your advocate and will help you get the best deal possible. Experienced real estate professionals can also make the home buying process more effective by helping you narrow down specifically what you are looking for in a home.

While it is possible for you to go it on your own without a real estate agent, it is not advisable unless you have solid experience in the real estate field yourself.

Lending agent/mortgage company

Naturally, you’re likely going to need to mortgage this significant purchase, and choosing the right mortgage company can make a big difference in your overall satisfaction with the home buying process.

Look for a lender who is highly reputable in your area and has solid reviews from customers as well as a good BBB rating. The ideal lender will present you with a variety of different mortgage programs and down payment options. They should be able to tell you rather quickly how much house you can afford. Quick response time and a history of in-house processing, underwriting and funding are also important factors that many home buyers find invaluable.

Real estate attorney

The process of buying a home is a very serious transaction with a plethora of details and minutiae. A financial decision as large as buying real property has many legal issues that only an experienced New Jersey real estate attorney is qualified to answer properly. No real estate agent should be giving you legal advice about your home purchase. Everything from translating legalese within the purchase contract to tax obligations and any existing or surprise property liens is best handled by your lawyer.

Working with a real estate attorney is especially crucial if you are purchasing a home via NJ short sale or Sheriff’s Sale (foreclosure). The added legal implications surrounding these types of home buying cement your need for a New Jersey real estate attorney who also specializes in foreclosure defense.

Title agent/company

Most experienced real estate attorneys can also perform title searches, but title companies have one job and one job only: making sure the home that you purchase has a clear title search. You will probably still want to purchase title insurance, as there is no guarantee that long-lost liens on the property will pop up in the distant future, but this is a decision that your real estate attorney can help you make along with your title agent.

Home inspector

Soon after you sign a purchase contract, you will be given the opportunity to do a professional home inspection on the property before the contract becomes official. In order to avoid making a significant financial blunder in purchasing a house that is wrought with problems, it is essential that you hire a home inspection company or professional home inspector who has substantial experience under his belt. Your home inspector will be able to discover any existing structural problems with the home that either weren’t disclosed by the seller or weren’t known to the seller. You will then be able to work with your real estate agent to either negotiate to have repairs made (at the seller’s expense), or, cancel the transaction if a satisfactory compromise cannot be made.

 

 

New Jersey Title Insurance: Do I Really Need it?

Purchasing real property in New Jersey (or in any state, for that matter), is definitely not a time to take short cuts. While most home buyers acknowledge this fact, some may still question the necessity of some of the steps along the journey to home ownership. The process of buying a home involves a pretty long checklist – if you’re doing things the right way.

One standard task that you need to accomplish before the closing date is purchasing title insurance. Buyers who aren’t familiar with title searches and title insurance may be caught off-guard when they discover another fee that they are responsible for in their quest to own a home. Important questions you may have include:

What is the purpose of a title search?
The person or persons listed on a property’s title are the rightful owners of the home. When the title insurance company (or your NJ real estate attorney) performs a title search on your intended home, they are looking for anything in the history of the property’s ownership that suggests there may be a problem in transferring the ownership of the home. This preliminary examination combs through records surrounding the previous ownership of the home, i.e: deeds, trusts, wills, divorce agreements, judgments, bankruptcies, tax records and liens. Any minor encumbrances (a lien that needs to be paid off, missing signatures) can usually be cleared up, allowing the sale to proceed.

Why do I need to buy title insurance if the title search was clear?
The reason title insurance is necessary is because it is virtually impossible for any initial title search, no matter how thorough, to foresee a claim to ownership that was filed incorrectly and/or is long-buried in a pile of dusty paperwork. Misspelled names, long-lost relatives, estate planning snafus and other problems can pop up at any time in the future – after you’ve already closed on the property and have moved in.

If a title problem arises after I’ve moved in, how will title insurance help me?
Your title insurance lender’s policy will act as a safety net if a buried problem turns out to present a real claim to the property even after you’ve closed on it. If a long-lost co-owner turns up and wants to enforce his claim of ownership, he can take the matter to court, however, even if he wins and is granted ownership of the home, your title insurance lender’s policy will pay your lender the balance on your mortgage. If you also purchase an owner’s policy, that will kick in to reimburse some or all of the money you already paid, such as a down payment and any initial mortgage payments.

How much does title insurance cost?
Purchasing title insurance is going to cost you a one-time fee of around $1,000, give or take, for the lender’s policy, and less than $100 for an owner’s policy. This is money well spent even if you never make use of the coverage. That may sound strange, but here’s why it’s true: on the very small off-chance that a missed claim surfaces and you are without title insurance, you could lose your home and a significant amount of money.

Virtually all lenders will require you to acquire title insurance before they agree to approve your mortgage. In addition, most NJ real estate attorneys won’t represent you if you attempt to refuse title insurance because of the inherent risks involved in your future as a property owner. Title insurance may seem unnecessary, but it is absolutely, without a doubt, a crucial piece of any New Jersey real estate transaction.

 

Stripping a Second Mortgage in a Chapter 13 Bankruptcy

Many people have taken out a second mortgage on their home. These second mortgages are usually referred to as home equity loans, because they are based on the amount of equity you have in your home. Your original mortgage loan’s value vs what your home is worth, along with your credit score determines how much money you can borrow through a home equity loan.

Typically, these loans are paid to homeowners in one lump sum so they can do home renovations or repairs. Some people use home equity loans to pay off a large debt with a high interest rate or to buy a vacation home. A home equity loan can seem extremely advantageous if you’re in need of some fast money, however the danger is that if you fail to repay the loan, you could lose your house.

Getting in over your head with your mortgage has been a popular theme in the past decade, so if you’re finding that you can’t make both your first and second mortgage payments, you’re not alone. Luckily, you do have some options.

If you could eliminate your second mortgage, would that make your monthly living expenses doable? Wishing you never took out that home equity loan? Filing for a NJ chapter 13 bankruptcy might be right for you.

A process known as ‘lien stripping’ can essentially erase that second mortgage, but this process is only available to debtors who file for chapter 13 bankruptcy. Additionally, in order to qualify for a lien stripping, your first mortgage balance must be higher than the current value of your home.

For example, if your first mortgage balance is $300,000, but your home is currently worth $275,000, you have zero equity in the property. In fact, you’re said to be ‘upside-down’ or ‘under water’ in regards to your first mortgage.

A $25,000 second mortgage would qualify to be stripped via chapter 13 bankruptcy in New Jersey. Upon application for a chapter 13 bankruptcy, your debts will be reorganized so that you can afford your monthly payments on all of your secured debt. In a chapter 13 bankruptcy, a second mortgage is referred to as a junior lien, and will be lumped in with all of your unsecured debts.

Throughout your chapter 13 repayment plan, you only have to pay a percentage of the total lump sum of all of your unsecured debts because they are considered “non-priority” debts. Upon successful completion of your bankruptcy payment plan, you will be granted a discharge. A chapter 13 discharge will put the lien strip into motion, and you will no longer be responsible for any remaining balance on your home equity loan or second mortgage.

The same is true for homeowners who also have a third mortgage on their home. If you want to stay in your home and would be able to afford your mortgage plus monthly living expenses if only you could “get rid of” your second or third mortgage(s), ask George about filing for a NJ chapter 13 today. You only have debt to lose!

 

NJ Senate Bill 1593: A Proposed 6 Month Foreclosure Stay

Because the number of New Jersey foreclosures continues to rise even as we are now reaching the mid-point of 2017, the NJ Senate and Assembly have proposed new legislation with the goal of generating positive change for underwater New Jersey homeowners.

Senate Bill 1593 proposes that a six month stay of foreclosure proceedings shall be implemented in New Jersey if such action is agreeable to the homeowner and lender. The bill also proposes that the court can impose the six month stay if it has been determined that it would be possible for credit counseling and/or negotiations to occur during the six months that would potentially eliminate the need for a foreclosure.

Homeowners who are offered a reasonable and feasible mortgage loan modification by their lenders prior to beginning foreclosure proceedings will not be eligible for the six month stay. If an acceptable loan modification agreement is reached between the parties during the six months, the forbearance will be lifted and mortgage payments will resume. Additionally, if at any time during the six month forbearance, the homeowner moves out of the residence or advises their lender in writing that they have no intention of participating in the formal foreclosure mediation program (required during the six month stay), the stay will be lifted immediately and foreclosure proceedings will commence.

This legislation is an attempt by the Senate Committee along with the Urban Affairs Committee to drastically reduce the overall number of NJ foreclosures that continue to plague the Garden State a full decade after the Mortgage Crisis that began in 2007. While most states’ real estate markets have bounced back, several states are still struggling with high foreclosure rates.

In addition to NJ, the following states still have excessively high foreclosure numbers as of May 2017: Florida, Nevada, Oklahoma, Illinois, Maryland and Delaware. New Jersey tops the list with a foreclosure rate of one in every 515 residential housing units. Delaware, in second place, has a foreclosure rate of one in every 753 housing units. As you can see, New Jersey is the clear “winner” by a landslide.

In fact, the country’s two most foreclosure-stricken cities are also in New Jersey, with #1 being Atlantic City and #2 being Trenton. Jersey’s neighbor across the bridge, Philadelphia isn’t far behind, coming in at #5 even though Pennsylvania’s overall foreclosure rates are down.

New Jersey’s continued inability to pull out of what can now only be described as a foreclosure emergency has led to damaging effects like neighborhood blight, which greatly reduces property values. This, in turn, leads to more homeowners who are ‘underwater’ (owing more money on their mortgage than their home is actually worth), which then leads to more foreclosures. The cycle seems unending in NJ, and drastic measures are needed to put a stop to the deleterious effects on the state’s economy. We have high hopes that New Jersey will be able to come out ahead of foreclosure, and this bill is one giant step in the right direction.

 

Fixing Your Credit to be Pre-Approved for a Mortgage Loan

If your credit score is very low (under 500), you may feel like you’ll never be approved for a mortgage. Owning your own home is a life-long dream for so many people, and luckily, it’s not one that you have to give up. You will, however, have some work to do before you will be granted a mortgage loan.

Anyone who is looking to buy a house in the relatively near future should take a good look at their credit report(s). The higher your credit score is when you’re approved, the better your mortgage rate will be. This can save you hundreds of dollars on your monthly mortgage payment. First, request a copy of your most recent reports from each of the three main credit reporting bureaus: Equifax, Experian and TransUnion.

As an aside, it’s wise to take a look at your credit report once a year on a regular schedule even if you’re not in the home-buying market.

Once you have a copy of your credit reports, the first thing on your agenda should be scanning it with a fine-tooth comb to check for any errors. This is the easiest way to give your credit score a quick boost.

If you find any errors (debts that are being reported incorrectly, satisfied debts that continue to show up as unpaid, payments marked as late when you paid on time), filing a dispute with the agency whose report contains the error(s) is the next step. Working with a New Jersey credit repair attorney is a good idea if you have errors and a lot of negative marks on your credit report. Your attorney will negotiate with your creditors, requesting forgiveness for lesser offenses like late payments. This “goodwill letter” is frequently an effective approach to jump-starting your credit repair process.

Once you’re sure that any errors have been appropriately dealt with, the following behaviors will give your credit score further boosts to get it up to your “goal range.” Your NJ credit repair attorney will know how much your score needs to increase in order for you to get pre-approved for a mortgage loan.

Make your monthly bill payments early

Even better, if you can make an extra payment each month on your credit cards with the highest balances, you’ll be able to zap your debts faster.

Create a debt resolution plan

In addition to making more than one payment per month, create a plan to pay down all of your existing debt until it’s gone. The lower your credit utilization ratio, the better.

Raise your credit limits

Related to lowering your credit utilization ratio, you can also request a higher credit limit on one or two of your credit cards. Be careful with this tip, though, and only do this if you have the self-control to keep yourself from charging even more purchases.

Consolidate

If you have more than one card with the same lender, keeping your oldest card active and transferring balances from newer cards (and then closing the newer cards), the overall age of your debt will be older, which looks good to credit bureaus.

If you are diligent about reigning in your spending, paying all of your bills early or on time, and taking the steps listed above, it is possible to boost your credit score 50-100 points in six months to one year. Your results will be dependent on your starting credit score and the type and number of dings currently on your credit report.

Before you know it, you’ll be walking out of your lender’s office with a mortgage pre-approval letter!