Disclaiming Your NJ Inheritance to Avoid Creditors

The news that you have been named a beneficiary in someone’s will is generally considered a positive thing; although you (hopefully) aren’t looking forward to the passing of your loved one, it usually feels good to know that they cared enough to bequeath part of their estate to you. There are times, however, when you may not wish to receive your New Jersey inheritance. Do you have the ability to say “thanks but no thanks?”

In New Jersey, estate law says that you can refuse to accept a gift, which in this case is your inheritance. This right to refusal is known as a disclaimer.

While it may seem strange that someone would choose to turn away inheritance money or life insurance proceeds, there are a few reasons for doing so. One of these reasons is avoiding creditors.

Do you have a lot of debt? Are creditors constantly calling? If so, you may worry that all of your inheritance money will go directly to paying off your debts. This is a very valid worry, because that is precisely what would happen if you accepted any kind of windfall while swimming in debt.

If you are attempting to disclaim your inheritance so that your creditors don’t have access to it, you may be hoping to divert that money to your children or other beneficiaries. Unfortunately, in New Jersey, it is illegal to use a disclaimer to get out of paying your creditors. If you choose to disclaim your inheritance under these circumstances, it is highly likely that your creditors will still be able to access the funds due to the Uniform Fraudulent Transfer Act.

Discussing your situation ahead of time with your loved one will give them a chance to protect the money that you are hoping to avoid giving directly over to your creditors. One way to do this is to set up a protective trust or to simply leave you out of the will altogether and instead name your children or other family members as beneficiaries. Your creditors have zero claims to any money that is inherited directly by your children.

Going to these lengths to avoid paying your creditors signals that you are significantly deep in debt. While we understand the desire to keep from handing a large windfall directly to creditors, we also must note that there are steps you should take to get out of debt, and the sooner, the better.

Your options for debt relief in New Jersey depend a lot on the specific details of your situation.

  • How much debt are you carrying in comparison to your income?
  • Are you living beyond your means?
  • What is your credit score?
  • Do you own a home that you wish to keep?
  • How many different kinds of debt are you carrying?

NJ debt negotiation and relief is available to you. Beyond refusing windfalls, disclaiming your inheritance and any other steps you’re taking to avoid paying your creditors, imagine if you didn’t have to worry about those creditors at all anymore. Ridding yourself of a large chunk (or potentially all) of your debt is very possible; your financial future can look anyway you want it to as long as you take the right steps, now.

 

 

Can I Close My Bank Account to Avoid Repaying a Payday Loan?

First, let’s be clear: Payday loans are illegal in the State of New Jersey. NJ state laws prohibit interest rates above 30% (which is exceptionally high already) and payday loan interest rates are much higher. Additionally, New Jersey banking laws prohibit the concept of advancing money based on a post-dated check.

What is a payday loan?

A payday loan is a very dangerous undertaking. It is process that is only entered into by those who find themselves in extremely dire financial straits.

The payday “lender” provides the borrower with a relatively small loan (usually less than $1,000). This cash loan is due to be paid back in full to the lender within a very short window of time – often when the borrower next receives a paycheck.

Those who are desperate for immediate money and don’t want to have their credit checked can often be fooled into thinking that a payday loan is the perfect solution to their problem. Borrowers who take out payday loans typically say that they don’t want to borrow money from friends or family, and their credit scores are usually already suffering, so taking out a proper bank loan isn’t on their radar.

Why do payday loans get such a bad rap?

In theory only, the concept of a payday loan is perfectly fine:

“You need rent money and your landlord is breathing down your neck about it. Due to unforeseen expenses this month, you’re short a few hundred dollars. If only you could simply borrow $400 to keep your landlord happy; you’ll have NO problem paying it back the next time you get paid.”

Sounds ok, right? The inherent problem with payday loans is this: if you are even a day late in repaying it, interest starts to accrue at an astronomical (up to 400%) rate. This, combined with the fact that by the time someone considers a payday loan, they are already having money trouble, leads the borrower down a path that can only end badly.

All payday loan borrowers talk themselves into believing that they’ll have the money to repay the loan on time. Most of them, however, arrive at their loan’s due date confounded and overwhelmed. Although they let themselves think their next paycheck would be enough to cover the cost of the loan plus their usual expenses, this is almost never the case.

Therefore, the average payday loan borrower ends up late in repaying their loan, either partially or in full. As soon as that interest starts building, their amount due climbs FAST. What started out as a $400 loan can end up as thousands of dollars in debt, leaving the borrower unable to even begin to make good on their promise to repay.

How can I get out from under a rapidly rising debt?

It can be an extremely scary feeling to know that your debt is rising higher and higher day by day at a rate that you can’t really even determine how much you owe. Drastic measures, like trying to close your bank account or moving away from the payday lender – will not solve your problem. Creditors can garnish your wages (up to a certain percent) until they get their money back, and unless you plan to leave the country and change your identity (not recommended) – they’ll go the distance needed to find you.

Although payday loans are illegal in New Jersey, that doesn’t mean that NJ borrowers aren’t taking out payday loans in neighboring states. If you’ve found yourself indebted to a payday lender, or if you are right now considering taking out a payday loan, you should consider filing for bankruptcy instead. Not only will this wipe out the money you owe to the payday lender, but many of your other debts can also discharged – giving you an opportunity to take stock of your money management with a clean(er) slate.

 

I Received a Bankruptcy Discharge – Why am I Being Sued?

Filing for bankruptcy can be a momentous decision for many people, and it usually isn’t a decision that is made lightly. Most people don’t want to have to file for bankruptcy and have genuinely tried in earnest to reduce their debts on their own.

Once you’ve decided to move forward with a bankruptcy filing, you’re likely to feel a certain sense of relief – especially as the case progresses and everything is going as planned. After your debts have been successfully discharged by your bankruptcy court judge, all of your dischargeable debts will be erased, lifting a heavy weight off your shoulders.

After a debtor receives a bankruptcy discharge, every creditor listed on their bankruptcy paperwork will receive notification of the bankruptcy. Creditors are no longer allowed to contact you to collect on debts that have been discharged. Just knowing that those aggressive phone calls are going to stop is a huge relief.

That being said, sometimes you may receive the unpleasant surprise of being sued by one of the creditors you thought you had seen the last of. This is a scary moment for anyone! Thinking that you’ve gotten out from under your debts only to discover that one of them is still after you for money is disheartening.

Can a creditor really sue me after my debts have been discharged?

Oftentimes, if a creditor is still trying to get you to repay a discharged debt, it means they didn’t receive proper notice of your bankruptcy. It’s also possible that your bankruptcy information was not shared through the right channels within the company – even if they did receive notice. Attempting to collect on a debt that has been discharged via bankruptcy is against the law.

Do I have to respond to a post-bankruptcy debt-related lawsuit?

This is where is gets kind of tricky. Even if you are no longer responsible for the debt in question, if a creditor has initiated a lawsuit against you, it cannot be ignored. Doing so will only prolong the lawsuit’s life.

Your bankruptcy attorney will be able to advise you on how to respond to any creditors who attempt to contact you after your discharge, including any that attempt to sue you for money you no longer owe. It is important to consult with your bankruptcy attorney to ensure that the debt(s) in question were actually discharged and you truly are no longer responsible for them.

An answer to any lawsuits should state the fact that you filed for bankruptcy, including a copy of your discharge and a list of all creditors. In doing so, virtually all lawsuits of this type will immediately dismissed by the court. Even if you inadvertently left a creditor off of your bankruptcy paperwork, generally all dischargeable debts will be forgiven as long as the creditor knows you’ve filed for bankruptcy.

Although you will almost never be responsible for any debt that was discharged, it is important to notify your lawyer if you are sued by one of your creditors after bankruptcy. Some debts are non-dischargeable, and you need to know what they are so that you continue making payments on them. However, chances are good that your NJ bankruptcy lawyer discussed any debts of this type with you prior to your filing date.

 

How to Invest in Your Future When You’re Broke

If you find yourself “barely” living paycheck to paycheck, the worry of not having any money saved can eat away at you. The concept of planning for future events like sending your kid(s) to college, helping them get married, and enjoying your own retirement can feel impossible when you can hardly afford your current lifestyle.

Although it may seem completely unimaginable, you can make a plan for your future; in fact, strategic financial planning may be the one thing that also helps you live better now as well.

The main reason most people don’t have a real savings plan in place is because they simply feel they don’t have enough money to do so. The change that needs to happen isn’t in making more money (although that is obviously not a bad thing) but in getting a new mindset.

The first step in getting a new money mindset is to change your inner dialogue from “I’m broke! I can barely even pay my bills!” to “Let’s see if I can find ways to improve how I spend money.”

While you may feel that you are barely able to meet the financial demands of your life, most people find that they’re spending too much in at least one area that can be cut back. Take a good, hard look at where all of your money goes for at least one complete month. Write down each and every cent that’s spent, organized into three categories:

  •  Necessary/survival: Housing (mortgage payment or rent), utility bills (electric, gas, water/sewer, trash removal), all forms of necessary insurance (homeowners/renters, car, health, life), food (for eat-at-home meals only), vehicle payment(s), vehicle maintenance, gas.
  • Debt: College/student loans, credit cards, personal loans, and any other forms of debt.
  • Luxury: These are things that, while dearly beloved by many of us, can be eradicated without causing you extreme hardship. Examples include: cable/satellite tv packages, streaming services (Netflix, Amazon, Hulu, HBO Now), high speed internet connection, Xbox Live membership, restaurant meals, magazine/newspaper subscriptions, cell phone(s) and their service plans, gym memberships, satellite radio, hair/nail services, frivolous (unnecessary) purchases like new electronics, expensive clothing/shoes, and other items that you simply don’t need.

Once you have a clear picture of exactly what you’re spending all of your money on, you will be able to create a plan to start saving money – it’s that simple!

Your mindset must remain steadfastly dedicated to saving money in order for this to work, however. See that list of luxury items? You are going to have to decide which of them you can either cut out entirely, or scale back. You will likely be surprised at how many companies will be happy to work with you to lower your monthly bill when you explain your situation. They’d rather keep your business at a lower profit than lose you altogether.

Instead of having your nails painted professionally, invest in the supplies needed to do your nails at home. Listen to the (free) radio in your car or pop in a CD rather than paying for satellite radio. Cut out your cable tv and keep your streaming services. Cancel your gym membership and get outside to exercise or start an indoor workout program – there are a multitude of free exercise videos on Youtube.

Even something as simple as not stopping before work to get a coffee and breakfast on-the-go can make a difference. If you spend $5 every day for a breakfast to-go, you can put that money directly into your savings account by eating breakfast at home. This habit can save you over $1,000 a year!

Another potential way to save money every month is to negotiate your interest rates with any lenders or credit card companies. You may also qualify for a loan modification (even for your mortgage loan) wherein the terms of your loan would be adjusted in order to make your monthly payments lower.

After you have found several good ways to save money each month – be sure to put the money saved into the right place! The best way to make sure this happens is to put a set amount into your savings account before you pay any bills or spend any money. That way you will train yourself to live on the money you have left after you’ve already invested in your future.

 

Will too Many Credit Cards Hurt my Credit Score?

While you may be worried that you have too many credit card accounts open, the truth is that there isn’t a magic number of credit cards that is “right” or “wrong”. With that being said, there are some important things to know about holding multiple credit card accounts at the same time.

The average credit cardholder has approximately 5 to 7 credit cards. This includes open and closed accounts. There is no cutoff number where we would tell you “You have too many credit cards,” because what we are more concerned about is your debt to credit ratio.

What Is a Debt to Credit Ratio?

Essentially, the debt to credit ratio means: how much of your total available credit (on all of your credit cards) have you used? In other words, if you have a total of $10,000 of credit available to you spread out over any number of cards and your current balances add up to $9000, you have a very high debt to credit ratio of 90%.

Why is this number important?

The reason why your debt to credit ratio number is significant is because it plays a big role in determining your credit score. Ideally, you want to keep your total credit card balances at 30% or less of the credit you have available to you.

You can have a really great debt to credit ratio with 10 credit cards (many people open cards in order to take advantage of different “points” systems), and you can also have a poor ratio with only one or two credit cards.

How Can I Improve My Debt to Credit Ratio?

While opening new credit cards would seem like the most logical strategy to increase your total amount of credit available, it is important that you don’t open multiple new accounts in quick succession.This will send up a red flag to credit reporting agencies because it may mean that you are borrowing money that you won’t be able to repay.

Try opening one or two new credit cards per year in order to gradually boost your total available credit. More importantly, make sure that you are paying your monthly minimums (or ideally, more) in a timely manner on a consistent basis. In fact, this is actually more important than your debt to credit ratio number. Your credit score is calculated by looking at a number of your financial habits, your income and your total debt. Approximately 65% of your credit score is based on how well you stay on top of paying your bills.

Additionally, your credit score will improve if you have a variety of types of credit. Credit diversity makes up about 10% of your credit score.

If you feel you have too many credit cards because the balances are way too high and you’re having trouble making payments, your problem lies in your debt to credit ratio rather than how many credit cards you have.

To reduce your total amount of credit card debt, you can choose one of many effective and proven methods. If you have already attempted to reduce your credit card debt and feel like you are drowning in debt you’ll never be able to repay – filing for New Jersey bankruptcy may be an option that you should consider.

Image: “Credit Cards” by Sean MacEntee – licensed under CC 2.0

I’m Being Sued for More Money than I Owe!

Is a debt from your past coming back to haunt you in the present? Although not ideal, sometimes it happens. Perhaps you weren’t making sound financial decisions at that point in your life and accidentally (or intentionally) ignored some past due notices until they just stopped coming.

It can feel like it’s easier to ignore bills when you don’t have the means to pay them. However, the end result is almost always going to be substantially worse than your original debt.

While it can take some companies awhile to take action on smaller debts, the bad news is that your (once) small-ish debt has had a load of time to compound upon itself, rolling around in interest rates, gathering late fees and potentially even picking up attorney’s fees. If your original lender or credit card company has hired counsel to address getting you to pay up, it is possible for them to tack their attorney’s fees on to the amount owed.

What can I do?

Your credit card company is hoping that you’ll get scared by the big number they’re asking for – as you should. If you receive a summons and complaint that says you owe double, triple or quadruple your original debt amount – now is the time to obtain counsel yourself.

How can I afford an attorney if I can’t even pay my debt?

Working with a New Jersey debt settlement attorney on a matter like this is highly unlikely to cost you thousands of dollars. In all likelihood, the right NJ lawyer will have the required negotiating skills to bring the amount owed down to a much more reasonable number – simply by making a few phone calls and/or sending some letters.

Your attorney can then work to coordinate a payment plan that is manageable for you so that you can pay off the (now much lower) balance. The lender/credit card company will almost always be happy to get some form of payment from you as opposed to nothing.

What will happen if my case goes to court?

If, by chance, your credit card company does not want to settle via your credit repair attorney, New Jersey courts will set up a mediation wherein the same kind of talks will take place. A court appointed mediator will work with you and your attorney, along with counsel for the opposing side, to negotiate a resolution that everyone can agree to.

The bottom line is: if you have been served with a lawsuit to collect a debt in a much higher amount than you originally owed, you’re probably not going to get out of paying at least part of the debt unless you file for bankruptcy. If you have the means to pay back the amount that your lawyer negotiates for you, you should do so in a timely manner so that your credit score doesn’t take an even bigger hit.

On the other hand, if you are completely strapped and cannot imagine even one dollar of your debt (and likely other debts that you owe) being repaid, it is definitely time to consider filing for a NJ bankruptcy. This will wipe out a significant amount of your total debt, leaving you much more financially stable, which will allow you to “start over” with a much cleaner slate.

 

Image: “Breaking into your Savings” by Images Money – licensed under CC 2.0

How to Defend Yourself Against a NJ Medical Debt Lawsuit

If you owe a hospital or private physician a large amount of medical debt and have been pursued by the hospital or a debt collector they’ve hired, there’s a strong possibility that the collection agency or hospital could decide to sue you for the remainder of the debt.

Don’t panic! We have compiled the steps and strategies that will help guide you if you are served with a lawsuit for your medical debt.

One of the most common mistakes debtors make when they are sued is not responding to the notice, which arrives as a “summons and complaint.” Debtors will often assume that if they do not have the money to pay the debt that they can just toss that summons and complaint in the trash and forget it. However, there are many avenues that are still available to you, even if you cannot currently pay the bill.

If you fail to respond to the summons and complaint, the collector will be awarded a default judgment against you. This will give them the power to pursue collection in more aggressive ways, including garnishing your wages or taking money directly from your bank account. Worse still, they’ll be able to tack on attorney’s fees, court costs, and potentially even accrued interest.

Now that you know you must respond to the summons and complaint, you’ll need to learn how to do so. The one thing you must NOT do is respond by simply saying you cannot pay the bills you owe. That’s like a defense attorney deciding to defend their client by announcing that the prosecution is correct! “Your honor, my client is guilty just like the prosecution says.”

With the help of your attorney, you’ll file an Appearance form before the Return Date listed on your summons and complaint. If you fail to do so, remember, you will be found liable by default. Your attorney will be able to fill out the paperwork for you, or guide you in doing so properly.

When you meet with your NJ debt resolution attorney, he will be able to advise you on the best defense against the lawsuit that was filed. The legal advice you receive will be tailored to your unique case details, with the end goal of proving that you are not responsible for the debt. Alternatively, your attorney may work to reduce the amount of medical debt you’ll have to repay over time.

Your attorney will demand that the collection agency or hospital prove that you owe the amount they claim. Experienced legal counsel knows what documents to demand in court from the opposing side. A strong defense straight out of the gate will often prompt the collection agency or hospital to begin settlement proceedings and reach a mutually satisfactory arrangement.

While it is possible to defend yourself in court against a medical debt lawsuit, you should strongly consider working with an attorney who will be able to take your individual situation into account and offer you the very best defense tailored to your needs. Only an experienced attorney who has complete access to your case will be able to do so.  You deserve the best assistance in your defense so that you can live out a peaceful future, which ideally does not include medical debt hanging over your head.
Image: “Hospital Municipal de Chiconcuac” by Presidenciamx – licensed under CC 2.0

The Best Tips for Paying off Student Loans Quickly

At the time you applied for and were granted a federal student loan, there’s very little chance that you were thinking about how long it would take you to pay it back. We’re all a bit naive and wet behind the ears when just starting our college studies. Buoyed by the prospect of a “well paying job” after your time at university, you, like many others, most likely figured that paying back your student loan debt would be a piece of cake.

As we all know, student loans are a whole lot less fun after college ends. No one likes the harsh reality of knowing that a large portion of your (newly acquired) paychecks will go toward paying back your student loans. Real life take home pay is usually a lot less than you thought it would be, and subtracting even more money from your net income can feel almost physically painful.

On top of how depressing it can be to fully realize just how much you owe, it can feel like you’ll be paying for your student loans forever. However, there are things you can do to make sure that feeling doesn’t become your reality.

Stop deferment as soon as possible

As a general rule, most student loans, both federal and private, will continue to accrue interest while in deferment. This means the longer you put them off, the more you’re going to owe.

Avoid income-based repayment plans

Also known as ‘pay as you earn’ or ‘income contingent’ plans, these repayment methods are geared toward college graduates who can demonstrate at least a partial financial hardship. In theory, limiting how much borrowers have to repay each month based on how much money they’re earning might sound like a good idea. The problem with dramatically lowering your monthly loan payments again lies in the staggering amount of interest that will be tacked onto the total amount due.

Be aware of income taxes if considering loan forgiveness programs

There are currently a number of federal and New Jersey loan forgiveness programs available for borrowers who have made a set number of payments over a given time period (usually 10, 20 or 25 years). While just knowing that the remainder of your loan will eventually be forgiven can be a light at the end of a tunnel, you may have to pay income tax on the amount that is forgiven.

If you’ve deferred your loan several times and then paid the lowest payments possible via income-based repayment, the interest will have been compounding for a long time. That interest will be added to the remaining balance, which may be a significant sum by the time you qualify for forgiveness. While you will be able to celebrate the debt forgiveness, you’ll still need to foot the hefty NJ income tax bill.

Refinance and consolidate your student loans

One of the best steps to take when trying to get a handle on your student loan debt is to lower your interest rate. You should first consolidate (combine) any loans that are eligible for refinancing. If your original student loan interest rates were high, you’ll save a lot of money over the course of your repayment plan by refinancing to get a lower rate. This can also shorten the length of time required for you to pay back your loans and, in turn, lower the amount of income taxes you’ll owe on any remaining balance if you qualify for forgiveness.

Earmark your yearly tax refund for student loan repayment

Each time you receive extra money, whether from your tax refund, a lawsuit settlement, an inheritance, etc., resist the urge to spend it frivolously and instead apply as much of the total windfall to your student loan balance. You can do the same every time you receive a raise at work, too. Set aside the extra income and pay that much above and beyond your monthly minimum loan payment.

Look for employment opportunities that offer loan forgiveness

The Public Service Loan Forgiveness Program forgives student loan debt in teaching and certain public and nonprofit jobs. You’ll have to meet a whole host of requirements in order to have your loans forgiven through your job, but it is something extremely well worth looking into.

In addition to the above strategies to get out of student loan debt quickly, you should consistently re-work your budget so that you can trim as much excess spending as possible. This will allow you to put more of your income toward repaying your debts faster. Your budget will only be stilted temporarily – so remind yourself that the end justifies the means.

 

Image: “Calculator and Money” by Reyner Media – licensed under CC by 2.0

5 Expert Recommended Methods to Raise Your Credit Score

If you are researching how to raise your credit score, regardless of the reason, we give you major kudos. Perhaps you are trying to repair a credit report that was damaged due to years of poor financial choices. On the other hand, maybe your credit score is fair and you’re getting ready to make a big change in your life that will be much easier with good to excellent credit, like buying a new house or starting a family.

You should always strive to have the best credit score possible, but many people experience dips in their credit score just as we experience ups and downs in life. Such is the nature of the beast. In order to raise your credit score effectively, we’ve gathered some expert-recommended tips that can make a significant difference in your overall credit report and number.

Before making any changes, you’ll want to make sure you pull your own credit report and have a good look over everything listed on it. Comb through each credit report from the three main credit reporting bureaus (Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion) very carefully to check for any mistakes that may have been made like debt that is being reported that doesn’t actually belong to you.

You can contact the reporting agency about any errors on your own or you can work with a New Jersey credit repair attorney to help you make the contact and clear up any errors that may be unnecessarily dragging your credit score down.

After you have determined that there are no errors currently weighing down your score, take the following expert-recommended steps to boost your score higher than ever before:

Pay monthly credit card bills before their closing dates

Even if you are managing to pay your credit card bills in full each month, you may be paying after your lender has already reported your balance to the credit bureaus. This will make it seem that your balance is high every month. What you must do is contact your credit card company or lender and ask when they make their monthly credit bureau reports. Henceforth, make your monthly payment well in advance of that credit card company’s closing date so that your balance will be reported to the bureaus as zero.

Create a debt paydown strategy

In order to optimize your credit utilization ratio (which means keeping it lower than 30% but optimally under 10%), work hard to pay down the balances on your card(s) that have the highest balances first.

Pay your debts every time you get paid

Most people pay their bills once a month, but there is a better way! Since it is common practice for most employers in the US to pay their workers on a biweekly basis, make it your new practice to make two payments on your credit card debt per month. Pay your monthly minimum as soon as you receive your first paycheck of the month, and then pay a little bit more with your second paycheck of the month. This will nudge your balance down much more quickly than only making one payment per month.

Lower your credit utilization ratio by requesting a higher credit limit

Although this is something that should not be attempted if you don’t trust yourself to stay within your own self-imposed spending limits, requesting a higher credit limit from your credit card company can lower your overall credit utilization ratio. Naturally, this will only work as long as you refrain from racking up anymore debt.

Consolidate multiple credit cards from the same issuer

With the ultimate goal of keeping your total credit limit the same, if you have more than one credit card with the same institution, consider requesting a consolidation of those cards. The goal of this is to increase the average age of your overall revolving credit, so request that your newer card be combined into the older card. This will eventually eliminate that newer card from your credit history and your debt will have an older overall age, which will help improve your credit score.

 

Image: “5” by Steve Bowbrick – licensed under CC by 2.0

Bankruptcy Law and Family Law: How They’re Connected

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Anyone who has been through a divorce knows that, second only to your love life, your finances are often the hardest hit area during a split. Many people continue to have financial difficulties long after their divorce is finalized, as well. Family lawyers who handle divorce cases know from experience that financial strife can be a huge contention between divorcing couples.

While your family law attorney will assist you in creating a Property Settlement Agreement that settles some of your money troubles (you may begin receiving child support or alimony payments after the divorce is finalized), oftentimes divorced couples will struggle with things like losing their family home to foreclosure, credit card debt, and potential bankruptcy.

As much as your divorce attorney may want to assist you with all of the above money matters, they have to focus their attention on everything within their own wheelhouse to ensure that you (and their other clients) achieve the desired outcome from your divorce. Their duties are many, and include drafting your PSA, attending court dates, negotiating and corresponding with counsel for your soon-to-be ex-spouse, handling domestic violence matters, and much more.

Frequently, family law attorneys find it very beneficial to work in tandem with an attorney who specializes in bankruptcy, real estate and/or debt relief. Because financial strain is a given in most divorces, it can be helpful for everyone involved to work as a team. Your divorce (family law) attorney will walk you through all of the steps of your divorce. With your permission, ideally he would then discuss your case with his tandem bankruptcy attorney, whom you would then work with to clean up your finances.

Of course, family law attorneys attend to matters other than divorce, like name changes, parenting time, grandparents’ rights, pre-nuptial agreements, child custody (unrelated to divorce), adoption, restraining orders, and domestic violence. Some of these matters can also be made easier by working with an attorney who specializes in finances. For example, the financial aspect of adoption matters can be quite intense. While your family law attorney will handle much of the adoption paperwork, he can refer you to a financial specialist like Veitengruber Law if you need more help organizing the necessary finances.

Every attorney has a lot on their plate every single day, regardless of their practice area(s). The best attorneys limit their focus to a limited number of practice areas so as not to get overwhelmed and spread too thin. If your family law attorney attempts to do it all himself, you may find that he’s too busy to set aside time to keep you updated on your case. On the other hand, a smart divorce lawyer will say, “Hey, while I’m working on negotiating your child visitation schedule, why don’t you go see George Veitengruber to start sorting out the fact that you can’t afford your mortgage payment?”

When attorneys work together, their clients always have a better result. Mutually beneficial relationships between experienced professionals give clients a well-rounded experience and optimal outcome. Veitengruber Law welcomes family lawyers in New Jersey (Monmouth, Ocean, Mercer, Burlington, Camden, and Gloucester Counties) to reach out to our firm if and when your clients need our services. We will gladly return the favor so that our mutual clients are well-cared for and happy with our services.

Image credit: Kamaljith KV