I Received a Bankruptcy Discharge – Why am I Being Sued?

Filing for bankruptcy can be a momentous decision for many people, and it usually isn’t a decision that is made lightly. Most people don’t want to have to file for bankruptcy and have genuinely tried in earnest to reduce their debts on their own.

Once you’ve decided to move forward with a bankruptcy filing, you’re likely to feel a certain sense of relief – especially as the case progresses and everything is going as planned. After your debts have been successfully discharged by your bankruptcy court judge, all of your dischargeable debts will be erased, lifting a heavy weight off your shoulders.

After a debtor receives a bankruptcy discharge, every creditor listed on their bankruptcy paperwork will receive notification of the bankruptcy. Creditors are no longer allowed to contact you to collect on debts that have been discharged. Just knowing that those aggressive phone calls are going to stop is a huge relief.

That being said, sometimes you may receive the unpleasant surprise of being sued by one of the creditors you thought you had seen the last of. This is a scary moment for anyone! Thinking that you’ve gotten out from under your debts only to discover that one of them is still after you for money is disheartening.

Can a creditor really sue me after my debts have been discharged?

Oftentimes, if a creditor is still trying to get you to repay a discharged debt, it means they didn’t receive proper notice of your bankruptcy. It’s also possible that your bankruptcy information was not shared through the right channels within the company – even if they did receive notice. Attempting to collect on a debt that has been discharged via bankruptcy is against the law.

Do I have to respond to a post-bankruptcy debt-related lawsuit?

This is where is gets kind of tricky. Even if you are no longer responsible for the debt in question, if a creditor has initiated a lawsuit against you, it cannot be ignored. Doing so will only prolong the lawsuit’s life.

Your bankruptcy attorney will be able to advise you on how to respond to any creditors who attempt to contact you after your discharge, including any that attempt to sue you for money you no longer owe. It is important to consult with your bankruptcy attorney to ensure that the debt(s) in question were actually discharged and you truly are no longer responsible for them.

An answer to any lawsuits should state the fact that you filed for bankruptcy, including a copy of your discharge and a list of all creditors. In doing so, virtually all lawsuits of this type will immediately dismissed by the court. Even if you inadvertently left a creditor off of your bankruptcy paperwork, generally all dischargeable debts will be forgiven as long as the creditor knows you’ve filed for bankruptcy.

Although you will almost never be responsible for any debt that was discharged, it is important to notify your lawyer if you are sued by one of your creditors after bankruptcy. Some debts are non-dischargeable, and you need to know what they are so that you continue making payments on them. However, chances are good that your NJ bankruptcy lawyer discussed any debts of this type with you prior to your filing date.

 

New Jersey Foreclosure: Frequently Asked Questions

In a New Jersey foreclosure sale, your home will be sold in an auction-type setting. The sale will be publicly announced and will be open for anyone to attend. Since New Jersey is a judicial foreclosure state, the local sheriff will typically lead the auction. If the sheriff cannot conduct your sale, another public official will do so.

Everyone who attends the foreclosure sale is able to place bids in order to buy your former home. As in all auctions, “to the highest bidder go the spoils.” The spoils in this case refers to your mortgaged home.

So: you stopped paying your mortgage payment. For a variety of reasons, people sometimes do this. Maybe you ran into temporary (or permanent) financial trouble because you: lost a job, got divorced, fell ill, made some poor money choices – the potential reasons are endless. Regardless of how you ended up in foreclosure, it’s probably not something you hoped would happen to you one day.

No one goes around saying, “I hope I get foreclosed on at least once in my lifetime!” Because foreclosure something you didn’t wish for – you probably don’t know what to expect. As a general rule, we don’t sit around thinking about things that we don’t plan to experience. Therefore, now that you have found yourself smack dab in the middle of a foreclosure, chances are that you have some questions.

We’ve covered a lot of foreclosure sub-topics here on our blog. Today’s foreclosure question we’d like to answer for you is:

“Who gets the money from the foreclosure sale?”

The normal course of a foreclosure auction is that the bidding remains rather low and the final, winning bid is often less than the house is actually worth. In fact, many times foreclosed homes are sold for less than the original mortgagor still owes the bank. There are, of course, exceptions.

Here is a breakdown of what will happen to the proceeds from your foreclosure sale, who receives payment, and in what order:

  • The first person/entity to be paid from the foreclosure sale proceeds is the New Jersey lender who granted you the loan for the mortgage in the first place. The bank or mortgage company needs to recover as much money as possible because you didn’t repay them like you originally agreed. A small portion of the proceeds will also go toward settling the cost of having the foreclosure auction.
  • If there is still money left after the sale is paid for and the lender has fully recovered the amount they are owed, any secondary lenders (2nd or 3rd mortgage granters) will receive the full amount you borrowed (perhaps for a home equity loan) or as much as possible.
  • After the above parties have received payment in full is the only time you, as the mortagor, will be entitled to receive any money from your foreclosure sale. Keep in mind: you are not likely to receive much, if any, money from a foreclosure sale because foreclosed homes don’t typically sell for as much as they would in a traditional real estate transaction.

In fact, you may even owe money when all is said and done. If the winning foreclosure bidder pays less than you still owe on the property, your lender will suffer a loss. This discrepancy is known as a deficiency balance. As the mortgagor, you can legally be held accountable for this amount.

You can learn more about NJ foreclosure procedures, get the answers to common foreclosure FAQs, and find out how a foreclosure will affect your life on our NJ law blog. We can also help you save your home via foreclosure defense, if that is your ultimate goal.

I’m Being Sued for More Money than I Owe!

Is a debt from your past coming back to haunt you in the present? Although not ideal, sometimes it happens. Perhaps you weren’t making sound financial decisions at that point in your life and accidentally (or intentionally) ignored some past due notices until they just stopped coming.

It can feel like it’s easier to ignore bills when you don’t have the means to pay them. However, the end result is almost always going to be substantially worse than your original debt.

While it can take some companies awhile to take action on smaller debts, the bad news is that your (once) small-ish debt has had a load of time to compound upon itself, rolling around in interest rates, gathering late fees and potentially even picking up attorney’s fees. If your original lender or credit card company has hired counsel to address getting you to pay up, it is possible for them to tack their attorney’s fees on to the amount owed.

What can I do?

Your credit card company is hoping that you’ll get scared by the big number they’re asking for – as you should. If you receive a summons and complaint that says you owe double, triple or quadruple your original debt amount – now is the time to obtain counsel yourself.

How can I afford an attorney if I can’t even pay my debt?

Working with a New Jersey debt settlement attorney on a matter like this is highly unlikely to cost you thousands of dollars. In all likelihood, the right NJ lawyer will have the required negotiating skills to bring the amount owed down to a much more reasonable number – simply by making a few phone calls and/or sending some letters.

Your attorney can then work to coordinate a payment plan that is manageable for you so that you can pay off the (now much lower) balance. The lender/credit card company will almost always be happy to get some form of payment from you as opposed to nothing.

What will happen if my case goes to court?

If, by chance, your credit card company does not want to settle via your credit repair attorney, New Jersey courts will set up a mediation wherein the same kind of talks will take place. A court appointed mediator will work with you and your attorney, along with counsel for the opposing side, to negotiate a resolution that everyone can agree to.

The bottom line is: if you have been served with a lawsuit to collect a debt in a much higher amount than you originally owed, you’re probably not going to get out of paying at least part of the debt unless you file for bankruptcy. If you have the means to pay back the amount that your lawyer negotiates for you, you should do so in a timely manner so that your credit score doesn’t take an even bigger hit.

On the other hand, if you are completely strapped and cannot imagine even one dollar of your debt (and likely other debts that you owe) being repaid, it is definitely time to consider filing for a NJ bankruptcy. This will wipe out a significant amount of your total debt, leaving you much more financially stable, which will allow you to “start over” with a much cleaner slate.

 

Image: “Breaking into your Savings” by Images Money – licensed under CC 2.0

Should I Quit My Job to Avoid Wage Garnishment?

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If you’ve recently discovered that a NJ lender to whom you are indebted plans to garnish your wages in order to recover some of your missed payments, it’s natural to feel scared and overwhelmed. How much of your paycheck can they legally garnish? Will your co-workers find out that your wages are being garnished? The fear of that embarrassment is what prompts some people in this situation to ask themselves if they should simply quit their job to avoid the wage garnishment.

Wage garnishment is a debt collection strategy utilized by some lenders when other debt recovery tactics have failed. If you, as a debtor, have not made good faith efforts to repay the money you owe to a particular lender, the lender can get a court order that will order your employer to pay a percentage of each of your paychecks to the lender.

Will quitting your job help you avoid wage garnishment? Well, yes! Wage garnishment only works if there are “wages” being paid for a lender to intercept. So, does that mean you’ve outsmarted the system?

You cannot outrun a debt by quitting your job. In fact, leaving a steady place of employment simply to dodge a creditor is foolish, as they will find new ways to extract the money from you, and it is impractical to think that you can remain unemployed until the 20 year statute of limitations on your lender’s judgement runs out.

Is there any way to stop a wage garnishment order while keeping my job?

Now you’re talking! Keeping your job is your best bet in this situation, because you do have other options. Need to get rid of a New Jersey debt that you can’t afford to pay? Priority number one is remaining employed. Check.

Next, it’s time to talk about filing for NJ bankruptcy. Maybe you don’t want to file for bankruptcy either; perhaps it feels like ‘giving up.’ You may not want anyone to find out that you filed for bankruptcy just as you were worried about people knowing your wages would be garnished.

GOOD NEWS: Bankruptcy today does not have the stigma it held a generation ago. Times have changed, many people have been through some difficult financial challenges in the past decade, and bankruptcy now looks like a pretty good option for a lot of people.

You’re not alone if you consider filing for bankruptcy. Many people have come to the realization that filing for bankruptcy is the best answer to settling their debts. Many New Jersey bankruptcy attorneys will not charge you a fee to consult with them – call and make an appointment to find out what your options are.

A chapter 7 bankruptcy will wipe your debts clean (with a few exceptions like child support and student loans). You’ll be left owing a significantly less amount of money as soon as your bankruptcy is discharged, giving you more money to pay your bills and live life with. You’ll be able to find your way back to a balanced financial situation and a bright financial future if you decide to file for NJ bankruptcy, and you won’t have to try to out-run your creditors.

Image credit: Christie Parker

NJ Bankruptcy Forms: The Creditor Matrix

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If you are weighing the pros and cons of filing for bankruptcy in New Jersey, you’ve likely realized that there is a large amount of paperwork involved in the process. This is true whether your past due debts would be best resolved with a chapter 7 bankruptcy or if your unique financial situation lends itself better to a chapter 13 bankruptcy repayment plan.

Although there are additional bankruptcy chapters, chapter 7 and chapter 13 are the two most common types filed by individuals and small business owners. Because bankruptcy filers are already in debt, it isn’t uncommon to contemplate foregoing an attorney. While it may seem like an easy way to cut corners, a bankruptcy attorney’s fees can save you a significant amount of money in the long run.

With that being said, if you choose to move forward without a lawyer, some of the required forms may confuse you, leading to critical errors in your bankruptcy petition if you aren’t careful. Always do your research before filling out any of your paperwork that you have questions about.

What is the creditor matrix?

While it may sound like something more complex, the New Jersey bankruptcy creditor matrix is a list of everyone to whom you owe money. The creditor matrix is also referred to as the creditor mailing list, because throughout the duration of your case, the court will use the matrix to notify your creditors of important case information.

Why is the creditor matrix so important?

Every debt that you wish to have discharged must be listed on your creditor matrix. Omitting a creditor can lead to that debt not being discharged. Even listing a creditor’s information incorrectly is reason enough for them to object to your bankruptcy discharge of their debt.

Creditors who aren’t notified about your bankruptcy will be entitled to continue collecting money from you. This is simply because they weren’t included in your creditor matrix; therefore, they never knew about your bankruptcy petition.

What do I need to know about filing a creditor matrix?

Every individual bankruptcy court has unique filing policies and formatting procedures for the creditor matrix. You can work with an experienced NJ bankruptcy attorney who will prepare and file the matrix for you. This eliminates any possibility of error, which is one of the huge benefits of hiring an attorney to file bankruptcy for you. Misfilings and omissions can cost you large amounts of money – much more than you would pay in attorney fees.

If I make a mistake on my creditor matrix, can it be fixed?

Making a mistake on your creditor mailing list won’t necessarily cause your case to be thrown out, but if you realize you’ve left off a creditor (or several), you’ll need to add them via matrix amendment. Each time you make changes to your bankruptcy petition, you’ll be charged another fee, and you’re required to notify all of your creditors about any changes.

Amending any part of your bankruptcy petition must be done according to the specific rules of your bankruptcy court. Creditors who are added to the creditor matrix will also need to be added to other sections of your bankruptcy petition, namely Schedules D, E or F.

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I’m Disabled and in Debt: Can I be Sued for the Money I Owe?

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Maybe you were plugging along with a solid debt-snowball plan that was going swimmingly, effectively reducing your overall debt bit by bit before you became disabled. Disability can happen to anyone, at any time, and can come in an endless number of forms. Whether you were in a vehicular accident, had a serious fall, or if you have been diagnosed with a serious illness or disease, the effect on your finances can be simply devastating.

Regardless of the cause of your disability, if you also have a large amount of debt you can’t repay, you may be feeling helpless and afraid of what will happen next. Will the credit card company sue you? Will you go to jail? Will your family be responsible for your debts?

The bad news is that you can be sued for unpaid debts, however, it’s the best kind of bad news you can get. If your disability has caused you to be unable to work, you probably don’t have very much money in your bank account. The good news, then, is that you have no money for your creditors to take, even if they do sue you. You don’t have to worry about going to jail, either, unless your creditor is your ex-spouse and the unpaid debt is child support. Even then, a change in life circumstance (your disability) can be entered into your family court case, which will reduce your support payments while you are disabled. And your family will not be responsible for debts taken out in your name only.

What if I collect Social Security disability benefits?

If your creditor sues you for a debt you owe them, they can have your bank account levied if you refuse to pay the judgement amount (your refusal would make sense if you actually can’t pay it due to lack of money.) However, some debtors do find themselves with at least some money in their bank accounts if they receive payments from Social Security due to their disability. The good news here is that disability funds are exempt from collection by creditors or collection agencies.

For those of you who are receiving disability benefits, it is of the utmost importance that you keep your disability money distinctly separated from any other monies you may receive. It is best to open a new bank account that will only receive deposits from Social Security. If you commingle your Social Security funds with any other funds that may trickle in while you are not working (gifts from family, yard sale money, proceeds from selling stuff on eBay) – you can risk losing some of your Social Security money if a levy is placed upon your bank account(s).

While many disabilities are short-lived, some are not, and still others are difficult to predict. Because of the unpredictable nature of so many disabilities, illnesses and injuries, your best bet is to file a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. This will rid you of the debt that is currently hanging over your head like a dark cloud and will release you from worrying about it. Your ability to focus on healing physically will undoubtedly improve with the weight of your debts lifted.

Your credit rating will take a hit if you decide to file for Chapter 7 bankruptcy in New Jersey. The same is true if you file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. However, the benefits of wiping out your extensive debts while you’re disabled are much greater than the effects of a lower credit score at this time. Your bankruptcy attorney will be able to help you improve your credit score after your bankruptcy discharge, so that you can get it moving back in the right direction, just as you will be able to improve your mental and physical health without the stress of owing so much money.

Image credit: Alexander Edward

$40,000 in Credit Card Debt – What Should I Do?

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Especially around the holidays, coming to terms with the fact that you’re drowning in debt is definitely a humbling moment. The good news is that you have acknowledged that the problem exists and that you need to take steps to get out of debt. Many people who are deep in debt feel that they have “no way out.”

A common phrase heard from severely distressed debtors (owing tens of thousands of dollars or more) is that they cannot afford to hire an attorney. Oftentimes, debtors have ignored creditors for a long time without making any payments on the debt they owe. This, in turn, causes the total debt amount to rise even higher due to interest rates and late charges.

By the time you have reached out for help and have landed on this page, you could very well be swimming in the amount of debt you’ve amassed. Overwhelmed, afraid, embarrassed and helpless, you probably have no idea how to get out of this dire situation.

“I absolutely cannot afford a lawyer.”

This line of thinking is one that we would like to abolish – not because we want more clients, but because we are here to help you. The misinformation that NJ attorneys are simply “too expensive” to even consider is nonsense, and here’s why:

There are New Jersey bankruptcy attorneys who will work with you when it comes to their fees. The most important takeaway is that you will be better off financially in the end if you work with an experienced attorney. Free consultations, payment plans, and other negotiations regarding attorney fees are available, if you look for them.

“Maybe I can take care of this on my own.”

If you are being sued by a creditor for a significant sum of money, the very last thing you ought to be doing is going into court to represent yourself. Pro se defendants are not successful in court, and no judge will show you “mercy” because you didn’t hire an attorney. The truth is: you cannot defend yourself against a mountain of debt that you’ve simply failed to pay. You need a legal strategy to get you out of the mess, or everything you own will have a lien against it, your wages will be garnished, and you will end up with nothing.

Change your line of thinking from “There is no way I can afford an attorney,” to “Can I afford to NOT hire an attorney?”

NJ bankruptcy attorneys who actually want to help you find a way out of your mess DO EXIST. If you’re embarrassed and think we’ve never seen anyone with as much debt as you – think again. We’ve seen it all before! And not only have we seen it, but we’ve fixed it and saved thousands of people from losing everything.

You do have options! No matter how unbelievably bad you think your money problem is, there is always a solution, and you won’t find it without an experienced NJ attorney’s help.

While it’s understandable that you think you can’t afford to hire an attorney, the reality is that you can’t afford NOT to.

Call, write, or read about your options. It may not seem like it now, but there is a way out of even the worst kind of debt.

Image credit: Images of Money

My Furniture was Repossessed! Do I Still Have to Pay for it?

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This time of year can put added stress on your finances, especially if you were already experiencing money trouble before the holidays rolled around. For some struggling Americans, the extra demands of the season can mean complete financial ruin. It’s a horrible time of year to be digging yourself out of a debt pit, but as the saying goes, “There’s no time like the present.”

If you’ve reached critical financial lows, you may have had a repossession company pay you a visit.  Anything that you purchased with credit and have since defaulted on (stopped making payments for) can be repossessed. For example, let’s say two years ago things weren’t looking so bad for you in the money arena so you decided to buy new living room furniture.

What nudged you into taking the leap for a new furniture set might have been the incredible (no down payment, no payments for a year) payment plan that was offered up by the salesperson. Some of your self-talk may have sounded something like:

  • “I can save up a little bit every month until the first payment comes due!”
  • “In a year, I will have gotten that raise at work so the payments will be no problem.”
  • “A year is a really long time. This is like getting free stuff!”
  • “I’ll worry about this later.”

It is frightfully easy to take home expensive items with generous lease-to-own or no money down payment plans. The trouble naturally will catch up to you, when the payments come due. If you’re not prepared and fail to make your payments on time (or at all) – what can happen?

Failure to hold up your end of the payment agreement for items like furniture, vehicles and other big purchases often leads to the company repossessing the item(s) for which you have not as of yet made any payments. Repossession is exactly what it sounds like: the company to whom you are indebted will hire a repossession firm to come to your home where they will take back the furniture that you haven’t paid for.

What happens after repossession?

The business that sold you the furniture will attempt to re-sell the (now used) pieces to recover at least some of the money they lost. You have no further rights to the furniture once it has been repossessed.

Will I still be liable for the payments?

After your furniture has been repossessed and sold, it is very likely that you will be charged for the difference between the used furniture’s sale amount and how much it was originally worth. This is called a deficiency. At that point you will be responsible for making payments on assets that someone else owns. This is not a desirable situation for anyone.

How will this affect my credit rating?

A repossession, or “repo” listed on your credit report can be quite detrimental to your credit score, so taking action now is imperative. You may have several potential defenses that a credit repair attorney can use to eliminate or reduce your deficiency liability. Filing for NJ bankruptcy is also an option that can help you turn things around if you don’t have any defenses (good reasons) for defaulting on your payments.

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NJ Student Loan Forgiveness & the Brunner Test

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A plausible solution for student loan debt is urgently needed as the dollar amount of outstanding college debt approaches $1.4 trillion. That astronomical number means that student loan debt is now second only to mortgage debt in our country.

Currently, money that was borrowed to pay for college is considered nondischargeable in a chapter 7 bankruptcy. This means that, for most people dealing with (what feels like) crushing student loan debt, there is essentially no way to get out from under what may be $50,000 + in debt.

Has the cost of college gotten more expensive?

The cost of four-year college tuition in New Jersey has increased by 41% in the last decade. Additionally, living on campus at a NJ college or university is now nearly 25% more expensive than it was ten years ago. These numbers are even higher for out-of-state students who attend college in New Jersey.

It now costs NJ students an average of $24,000 for ONE YEAR of college tuition, fees, room & board, books & supplies and living expenses.

With that being said, there are proponents of an idealistic plan for two and four year college tuition to be free. Opponents of this utopian plan believe that offering free college won’t fix the problem because the problem ultimately stems from wages being too low.

What other factors have caused the student loan debt crisis?

There is evidence that the largest group of people who’ve defaulted on student loans are those who are earning the lowest income post-college. Data indicates that some of these defaulted borrowers are struggling because they didn’t finish college, and therefore didn’t obtain a degree. This leads to difficulty finding a job that pays enough for them to pay off their loans. Although there are a few student loan repayment programs that are based on earnings, they need serious improvements if they are to make a dent in what is quickly becoming the “student loan crisis.”

Hopefully there will be positive changes coming to the process of paying for a college degree that enable more people to finish college without being bogged down by debt. Until then, the only way to rid yourself of your student loans through bankruptcy is by demonstrating “undue hardship.”

What is undue hardship?

Relating to student loan repayment, the only reason you may be able to discharge your student debt is if repaying your loans would prevent you from being able to do literally anything else, like pay bills, buy food, etc. In New Jersey, the three part Brunner test is used to determine if a debtor demonstrates undue hardship that is significant enough to justify a discharge of student loan debt.

What is the three part Brunner test?

New Jersey bankruptcy court will require you to prove that the three following statements are true as relating to your finances:

  1. You will not be able to maintain even the most minimal standard of living (for yourself and any dependents) if you have to repay your student loans. The answer to this must be based on your current income and expenses.
  2. There is sufficient evidence to prove that #1 (above) will prove to be true for all or most of your student loan repayment time period.
  3. You have made a good faith effort to repay your student loan(s).

Most courts are fairly strict when it comes to the Brunner test, however, if you feel that you honestly would qualify for a hardship ruling in your favor, it is worth discussing the matter with a NJ bankruptcy attorney. As your initial consultation will be free of charge, you have nothing to lose by making a phone call and learning more about your options.

 

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Wage Garnishment: FAQ

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What is wage garnishment?

If you owe money to a person or company that you have failed to repay or even begin to repay, the creditor (entity to whom you are indebted) can obtain a court order against you. This court document will order your current employer to take a specific amount of money out of each of your paychecks. This money will go directly to the creditor to whom you owe money.

How much of my paycheck can be garnished?

There are federal laws in place that limit the amount of money that can be garnished from anyone’s paycheck so that the debtor can still manage their monthly expenses. Generally, no more than 25% of your income (after deductions) can be garnished by any combination of creditors who may be seeking money from you.

Can I lose my job because of a wage garnishment?

If you have only one garnishment against your wages, your employer does not have the right to terminate your employment, nor can they punish you or treat you any differently because of a wage garnishment.

Multiple wage garnishments filed against you will give your employer some rights to take action. For example, suppose your employer discovers that you are neck-deep in unpaid debt and your job duties include dealing with company finances. Your severely disordered finances at home send up a red flag, and many times employers do have rights against you when the garnishments keep rolling in.

What can I do to eliminate a wage garnishment?

If you feel that a wage garnishment has been filed against you erroneously, you can protest the garnishment at a court hearing. You may also have rights if you cannot manage your bills with the wage garnishments set as they are.

Additionally, you can immediately eliminate any and all wage garnishments by simply paying off the debts in full. If you are starting a new job and don’t want your new employer to know that you owe money to a creditor, your best bet is to try to work with your debt negotiation lawyer to lower the amount you owe so that you can pay it all off in one fell swoop.

Can I eliminate all wage garnishments?

While you can “cancel out” a wage garnishment for say, credit card debt, defaulted loans or medical debt, some garnishments are harder (and sometimes impossible) to remove. For legal reasons, if you owe child support, your NJ county court will automatically set a wage garnishment action in place once your Final Judgement of Divorce has been entered. This guarantees that your children will always be cared for appropriately with no missed payments.

The same is true if you owe money to the federal or state government in the form of back taxes, or if you have delinquent student loans. In fact, wage garnishments for child support, taxes and student loans can even be initiated without a court order.

If you are facing a wage garnishment in New Jersey that you feel is inaccurate or that is preventing you from meeting your other basic financial obligations, work with your NJ debt relief attorney to either modify the wage garnishment order(s) or eliminate them if they are unlawful.

 

Image credit: Tax Credits