How Bankruptcy Impacts Your Inheritance

Making the decision to file for bankruptcy can be difficult, but sometimes bankruptcy is the best answer to your financial difficulties. Filing for Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy can be the tool that helps you get out from under massive debt. But the process of bankruptcy isn’t easy and it comes with some hard to swallow consequences. If you are expecting to receive an inheritance soon or if you have recently been the recipient of money or property from a loved one who has passed, you need to think about what bankruptcy can do to your inheritance.

In bankruptcy, there is a 180-day rule. Once you file, the first 180 days immediately after are critical to your bankruptcy case. In this time period, whatever income you receive becomes part of the bankruptcy estate. Any inheritance you receive during this time will also become part of the bankruptcy estate and what happens to that inheritance will depend on your specific bankruptcy case. It is important to note that you do not have to actually have possession of the money or property you are entitled to in your inheritance for it to be included in the bankruptcy. As long as you become entitled to the inheritance within the 180-day time frame, it will be included in your bankruptcy.

If your spouse receives an inheritance, it is not necessarily part of the bankruptcy estate. Your spouse’s inheritance will only be included in the bankruptcy estate if you are filing for bankruptcy together. If your spouse is not included in the bankruptcy case, then the inheritance should not be included. The only way the inheritance could become part of the bankruptcy estate is if it is used in conjunction with marital assets. The best way to avoid this issue is to keep your spouse’s inheritance totally separate from any shared assets.

You are responsible for notifying the bankruptcy trustee of the money or property you are entitled to under your inheritance. Even if you fear the inheritance may be taken during the bankruptcy to pay off creditors, you cannot withhold this information. Talk to a bankruptcy attorney about when and how to notify the bankruptcy trustee. There may be specific forms you need to amend for your case depending on whether the inheritance was money, personal property, land, or a structure.

Whether or not you will be able to keep this inheritance depends on if it falls under an existing exemption. In New Jersey, you can keep up to $1,000 of personal property and up to $1,000 of furniture and household goods. You are also entitled to keep your clothing and your burial plot. If married and filing jointly, you and your spouse can double the personal property exemption to $2,000. Your bankruptcy attorney will be able to help you understand what part of your inheritance, if any, is exempt. If your inheritance is not exempt, the court will liquefy the asset to go towards paying off creditors under Chapter 7 or it will be included in the calculation for your payment plan under Chapter 13.

If your loved one passes or you become entitled to the inheritance 181 days or more after you filed for bankruptcy, it is not part of the bankruptcy estate. Under Chapter 7 bankruptcy, your inheritance is yours to keep and it will not be used to pay off creditors. Under Chapter 13 bankruptcy, however, your inheritance could be calculated into your monthly payment plan. Unless it is exempt, your bankruptcy trustee can count it as income and determine how much of it should go towards your outstanding debts.

Bankruptcy can be a confusing and difficult process. Don’t become overburdened with stress over all the little details. At Veitengruber Law, we’re experienced in handling the intricacies of New Jersey bankruptcy law. If you are concerned about how bankruptcy can impact your inheritance, we can help.

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How to Avoid Bankruptcy in Retirement

bankruptcy in retirement

Bankruptcy filings for retirees are rapidly increasing across the US. As poorly funded pensions and retirement savings shrink, retirees look to bankruptcy to put a stay on some of their monthly payments. Rising healthcare costs, adult children living at home for longer, and the financial inability to properly save for a retirement that extends into longer lifespans have all contributed to the rising senior bankruptcy rate. How can you avoid this trend and spend your golden years in peace? Here we look at a few ways to make sure you aren’t filing for bankruptcy after retirement.

1. Settle Your Debts

Regardless of how much you have invested into your retirement, if you’re carrying a mountain of debt into retirement you could end up financially strapped pretty quickly. Paying off as much debt as possible before retirement should be your number one goal. High interest credit cards are the most important to pay off, followed by your mortgage and car payment. The less debt you carry into retirement, the more money you will have to cover your living expenses. If you are struggling to tackle your debt and you are approaching retirement, sit down with a debt negotiation attorney to figure out what your options are.

2. Be Clear with Children and Other Family Members

It is very tempting to be generous with family members and other loved ones. However, you need to be realistic about when you can actually afford to help and how much this will impact your retirement savings plans. Parents should not feel obligated to pay for college, a wedding, or other big life events if they do not have the means to do so. The best thing to do is communicate these financial boundaries early. Adding more debt to your plate in order to help a family member can be disastrous for seniors looking at retirement. After all, if you do not prioritize your financial health over that of your loved ones, you could end up becoming a financial burden to them later on.

3. Downsize

Retirement comes with a lot of big life changes. More leisure time, the freedom to travel, and the ability to explore new hobbies come hand-in-hand with some harder lifestyle changes. With the inevitable reduction of income in retirement, retirees often find they cannot afford to keep up with their day-to-day expenses. Buying a smaller home or renting and downsizing to one vehicle instead of two or three can help you establish a leaner budget before retirement. This should make it easier to embrace a reduced retirement income.

4. Be Smart About Social Security Benefits

The biggest concern most people have about retirement savings is running out of money. Getting a part-time job to boost your retirement portfolio can help buoy your finances in retirement. Most retirees need about 80% of their pre-retirement income to maintain their lifestyle. Your Social Security benefits will mirror the average of your pre-retirement wages. It is important to keep in mind that your social security benefits will likely not cover even half of your retirement expenses. The longer you can go without tapping into social security, the better your financial situation will be in retirement. Even if you have the option to start using your Social Security, only do so when it is absolutely necessary.

5. Invest!

The shakiness of the market over the last two decades has many Americans making uber conservative investment decisions about their retirement. Investing doesn’t have to be scary. In order to keep up with cost of living adjustments and to give yourself a generous nest egg to work with in retirement, it is important to invest savings into a diversified portfolio of common stocks. Especially if you are a few decades away from retirement, it is a good idea to use the time you have to put your assets into money market funds. Investing your money, as opposed to letting it sit in a bank, can make all the difference for your funds in retirement.

Many seniors and those approaching retirement age have anxieties about the financial realities of retirement. Veitengruber Law can provide the services you need to establish a robust retirement plan. From asset protection and debt management to bankruptcy litigation, we can help you get the peace of mind you need. We also work with a diverse network of professionals who can help you invest, downsize, and make a comprehensive retirement plan that will be effective. Don’t wait until you are enjoying your golden years to have second thoughts about your retirement plan. Take action today to secure your financial future.

Secured vs Unsecured Debt: Understanding the NJ Bankruptcy Petition

New Jersey bankruptcy

At the beginning of every bankruptcy case, the person filing will need to complete official bankruptcy forms. The cover document, known as the petition, will include identifying information like your name, address, and the chapter of bankruptcy you are filing. The petition will also include information about your income, your creditor claims (or debts), and assets in specific forms called schedules. Classifying creditor claims can be complicated. All of your debts will need to be listed as either a secured or unsecured claim. It’s important that you properly label each debt. Here, we look at how to list creditor claims in your bankruptcy paperwork.

Secured Claims

In order to have a secured claim in bankruptcy, you must have two things: a debt that you owe and a lien or security interest on property that you own. Examples of secured debt are a mortgage, a car payment, or another collateralized debt. If you fall behind on payments or are unable to keep up with the terms of your contract, the lien can allow the lender to recover the property through foreclosure or repossession. The lender will then sell the property and use the proceeds to pay down your account balance. Secured claims are typically voluntary, but a creditor could obtain an involuntary lien against your property. A creditor could secure an involuntary lien against your property through a lawsuit, whereas if you fall behind on your taxes, the IRS automatically has the right to a tax lien against your property.

During bankruptcy proceedings, a creditor with a secured claim has an advantage. A bankruptcy charge will remove your obligation to pay a debt, but it will not remove a lien on your property. Because of this, a creditor can still opt to take back the property if the loan does not get paid. Therefore, if you file for bankruptcy but you don’t want to lose your property, continue making payments to the lender until the debt is paid off. It is possible to get rid of specific types of property liens in bankruptcy. One option is to get a legal judgement on the grounds that a lien negatively impacts your bankruptcy exemptions. Another option is to wipe out an unsecured junior lien through Chapter 13 bankruptcy.

Things can get complicated, though, if there is significant equity in the property in question, as you will be able to protect a certain amount of equity in bankruptcy. Under Chapter 7 bankruptcy, the trustee will likely try to sell the property. However, the trustee has to make enough in the sale to pay off the loan, return any exempt funds to you, and pay off creditors. The trustee will likely not sell the property if there is not enough equity to pay something worthwhile to creditors. On the other hand, a Chapter 13 bankruptcy will allow you to keep any property with significant equity, as long as you can afford high monthly payments towards the nonexempt equity in the plan.

Unsecured and Priority Claims

With unsecured claims, there is no lien involved in the debt owed. It is, however, important to know if the claim is priority unsecured or nonpriority unsecured. Priority unsecured claims are not dischargeable and will take precedence in repayment plans over nonpriority debts. Examples of priority claims are alimony, child support, tax obligations, and debts from personal injury or drunk driving lawsuits. Priority debts cannot be discharged in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy and you will still be responsible for paying back the full balance. In Chapter 13 bankruptcy, you will have three to five years to pay back the balance in full.

Nonpriority unsecured claims are dischargeable with the exception of student loans. Before these debts can be paid with bankruptcy funds, all priority debts must be taken care of first. Examples of nonpriority unsecured claims are credit card debt, medical bills, and personal loans.

Filing for bankruptcy includes a lot of detailed, complex paperwork. Determining how to categorize your debts can be confusing for the average consumer. Veitengruber Law offers a total approach to debt relief. Our experienced legal team knows how to expertly demystify the bankruptcy process so that our clients have a clear understanding of what is happening – every step of the way.

What Debts Must You Pay During Chapter 7 Bankruptcy?

Chapter 7 Bankruptcy

Chapter 7 bankruptcy is a useful tool to get out from under different kinds of dischargeable debts. Credit cards, medical bills, and personal loans all fall under debt that can be discharged as long as you meet specific Chapter 7 income requirements. It is important to note that while a Chapter 7 bankruptcy can get rid of a lot of your debts, there will still be debt you are responsible for paying during and after the bankruptcy process. It can be confusing to determine what you are still responsible for during and after bankruptcy. Here, we look at the debts you must keep paying even while filing for Chapter 7 bankruptcy.

Post-Petition Debt:

You will likely still receive bills while your bankruptcy case is pending. If the debt in question was incurred after you filed for bankruptcy, it is not included in your case and you will be responsible for paying it. These debts are called “post-petition” debts and they typically include child support, alimony, utilities, rent, homeowner’s association (HOA) fees, insurance, and most taxes. The court will determine on a case by case basis if any of these kinds of debts included in the filing will qualify for a discharge. Whereas most utility bills incurred before filing are dischargeable, child support payments are not and you will continue to owe on your outstanding balance after the case for these debts.

Secured Debt:

Secured debt typically occurs with the use of credit purchase of expensive property. In these cases, the lender typically requires collateral to use in case you cannot meet required payments on the loan. A mortgage or car loan are common examples of secured debt. Whether or not you should continue to make payments on these loans depends on if you plan to keep the property associated with the loans. If you give the property used for collateral back to the lender, then the loan will likely be discharged with your bankruptcy case.

If you want to keep the property in question, you should keep making regular payments through your bankruptcy and after. If you do not continue to make payments, even if you are in the middle of bankruptcy proceedings, the lender could use their rights to take back the property through foreclosure or repossession. There will be a temporary stay (more on that below) to prevent your lenders from taking legal action during bankruptcy proceedings, but lenders can file a motion to proceed even during a bankruptcy. Regardless, once the bankruptcy case has closed, the lender is free to pursue their legal rights to repossess the property if you have not kept up with payments.

Payment Responsibility:

In the event you cannot discharge all of your debt, you will still get a brief payment break on the debts that you cannot discharge, like student loans, taxes, and court fines. During the automatic stay, creditors will not be able to attempt to collect on your debts. Once the temporary stay has lifted, however, you will be legally obligated to resume payments on all non-dischargeable debts. How much you will owe on these debts post-bankruptcy depends on whether or not you plan to or are able to keep the property associated with the debt.

Filing for bankruptcy can be confusing and intimidating. At Veitengruber Law, we have years of experience working with clients throughout bankruptcy filings. We can help demystify the process so you can make confident and informed decisions about your financial future. Our experienced legal team will guide you through the legal ins and outs of a bankruptcy so you know exactly what to expect.

How to Buy a Home After NJ Bankruptcy

NJ bankruptcy

Buying a home is at the core of the American dream. The advantages are clear: tax incentives, stability, investment, and being independent of a landlord. Since the housing market crash of 2008, banks have become much more scrutinous of potential homebuyers’ credit history. Do you have to give up on your dream of home ownership if you’ve had a NJ bankruptcy discharge? You may be surprised to learn that owning a home is a real possibility.

In chapter seven bankruptcies, an individual’s assets are liquidated and used to repay their debts, with any remaining debts are discharged, or cleared. This will give you a clean financial slate to start over with. In a chapter thirteen bankruptcy, you can keep some assets but you will have to abide by a payment schedule for repaying your debts over three to five years. After the time period is over, your remaining debts are often dismissed. There are several different types of home loans that have different requirements for post-bankruptcy discharge.

New Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency (NJHMFA) Down Payment Assistance (DPA)

If you are a potential first-time home buyer you may want to look into the NJHMFA Down Payment Assistance program. It provides $10,000 towards a down payment and/or closing costs. The DPA is considered a second loan with no interest or payments. Once a buyer has lived in their home for five years, the loan is considered paid. There are several qualifications that must be met in order to participate in the program:

  • You must wait 24 months after chapter seven or chapter thirteen bankruptcy discharge.
  • You need to have a FICO credit score of 620 or above and meet debt-to-income requirements.
  • Only homes purchased in New Jersey are eligible.
  • The DPA must be paired with an NJHMFA first mortgage loan which is a 30-year fixed interest, government-insured loan through participating lenders.
  • The property must fall below purchase price limits.
  • The borrower’s income must fall below limits of 140% of median area income.

Qualifying for $10,000 interest-free is a huge incentive to acquiring an NJHMFA loan. After your bankruptcy discharge you can work towards meeting these requirements and getting your credit score above 620.

Federal Housing Authority (FHA) Loan

If you’re not a first-time home buyer or don’t otherwise qualify for the NJHMFA loan, an FHA loan is your next best bet. An FHA loan is a government-insured loan which has less requirements than conventional loans.

In regards to chapter seven filings, you’ll need to wait two years after the date of discharge (with a notable exception). If you can prove that you filed for bankruptcy due to no fault of your own, you can apply for a twelve-month exception. These circumstances may include illness, divorce, or theft. You will also need to demonstrate responsible financial behaviors in the months following the discharge.

Chapter thirteen filings require ongoing payments for three to five years so if you wish to purchase a home during that time, you will need to involve the court in your loan application. This is where a skilled bankruptcy attorney like George Veitengruber can assist you and present your purchase in the best possible light. First, you must make twelve months of payments to creditors. You will need to show the court that the reason you filed for bankruptcy was an anomaly.

Conventional Loans

Conventional home loans have tougher requirements for post-bankruptcy home buyers. Both chapter seven and chapter thirteen bankruptcies require a waiting period of 48 months after discharge to apply. In the exception of bankruptcy that was beyond your control, the waiting period can be reduced to 24 months. A conventional loan requires a twenty percent down payment on a property. Down payments of less than twenty percent are subject to mortgage insurance, which can be removed after the 20% has been paid. Conventional loans also traditionally require a higher credit score than an FHA loan.

The good news is that bankruptcy does NOT mean the end of your financial independence. You can rewrite your story and craft your new future. Since each of these loans requires a waiting period, take that time to plan carefully rebuild your credit so that you can embark on your new home purchase with a solid financial foundation.

What Should my Budget Look Like After a New Jersey Bankruptcy?

New Jersey bankruptcy

When overwhelming debt and missed payments start to control your life, bankruptcy can offer a fresh start to begin rebuilding your finances. It is important to take advantage of this clean slate by doing everything in your power to learn from past financial mistakes and create better habits for your future. Debt can accumulate from overspending, a medical emergency, or the loss of employment or income. No matter how you found yourself in debt and filing bankruptcy, there are steps to take to make sure it doesn’t happen again. One of the best ways to become more aware of your finances and prepare yourself for unexpected expenses is to create a household budget.

A household budget will allow you to track your spending and find opportunities to build your savings. Every budget will look different for every household, which is why you need to make sure you are creating a realistic budget that works for your household. Learning how to use this helpful tool will help you manage your money and bounce back fast after bankruptcy. Here are some steps to creating a household budget while recovering from bankruptcy:

1. Track Your Expenses

Take the first thirty days after bankruptcy to track how much money you are spending and what you spend your money on. The best way to do this is to create a spreadsheet listing different categories of expenses and then tracking these expenses throughout the month. Make sure you include every purchase you make to ensure you are getting the most holistic view of your finances. After you spend one month tracking your expenses, subtract your total expenses from your total monthly income.

2. Adjust Your Spending Habits

What are the results? Pay attention to where your money is going. You should never be spending more than you earn in a given month. If you have more money going out than coming in, it’s time to figure out where to make some spending cuts. You should start by determining which expenses are essential, like groceries and utilities, and which expenses are not. Start cutting back on any non-essential expenses.

3. Allocate Your Income

Once you know where your money is going and where you can start to make some cuts in spending, it’s time to figure out how you’re using your money. The best way to do this is to determine what percentage of your monthly income goes to specific expenses. For instance, if your monthly income is $4,500 and you spend $1,000 a month for your mortgage payment, you’re spending 23% of your monthly budget on your house. Here are some suggested percentages to compare with your budget:

  • Medical: 5-10%
  • Housing: 25-35%
  • Transportation: 10-15%
  • Savings: 10-15%
  • Food: 10-15%
  • Utilities: 5-10%
  • Insurance: 10-20%
  • Recreation: 5-10%

These percentages are only meant to serve as rough guidelines and they will not work with every household, but this is a great jumping off point for creating your household budget. If you find your spending in the above categories is significantly higher than recommended, you may want to start cutting back on those costs.

4. Finalize Your Household Budget

Based on the above information, you should be able to create a monthly budget that works for your household. Continue to track your expenses to keep yourself accountable for your spending and to make sure your budget is realistic. Staying aware of your spending habits will help prevent former bad habits from resurfacing. Pay specific attention to growing your savings and emergency funds. These financial reserves can really save you in the event of an emergency.

At Veitengruber Law, we know that life is unpredictable and rarely goes according to plan. A monthly budget can’t account for everything life will throw at you, but it can help you prepare for unexpected life events and sudden expenses. Creating a household budget will help bring some stability to your financial status and ensure you can weather the set-backs. If you need help making your post-bankruptcy budget, we can help!

Will a New Jersey Bankruptcy Resolve My Plastic Surgery Debt?

new jersey bankruptcy

Medical debt is one of the leading causes of excess debt in the US. Even when covered under medical insurance, many NJ residents find themselves facing bankruptcy as they struggle under the pressure of medical debts. Bankruptcy can seem intimidating, but it can be a great way to get a fresh start if you find yourself struggling to pay back medical debts. Whether you choose to fully discharge these debts under Chapter 7 bankruptcy or enter into a more manageable repayment plan with a Chapter 13 New Jersey bankruptcy reorganization, filing for bankruptcy can set you on the path to financial health.


Bankruptcy is meant to allow people to move forward from previous financial mistakes or setbacks.


What about plastic surgery debt?

While it is true that plastic surgery is a medical procedure, it is elective and that choice makes the difference when filing for bankruptcy. Plastic surgery is considered a luxury debt. Luxury debts include any goods or services you purchase with a credit card that are not considered necessary to the maintenance of you or your dependents. Also in this category are jewelry, home décor, beauty products/services, vacations, electronic devices, and even alcohol. It is important to include any luxury debt when you file for bankruptcy, but that doesn’t mean these debts will be discharged.

The timing of the purchase of these products and services is what is crucial to whether or not they will be discharged in your bankruptcy case. In NJ, if the debt was accrued within the 60 days immediately before you file for bankruptcy, it is within the right of the credit card company to refute your claim. The credit card company could argue that you made the purchase using credit you had no intention of paying back. This is called constructive fraud, or fraud that occurs when a debtor’s actions imply fraud even if their intentions weren’t to commit fraud. Any luxury purchases totaling $1,150 or more made in the 60 days just prior to your bankruptcy is filed could be scrutinized as constructive fraud.


There are a plethora of myths and misconceptions surrounding bankruptcy proceedings. Turn to an expert when you have questions.


If either your credit card company or plastic surgeon decide to sue for nondischargeability of the debt, you will become the defendant in a lawsuit. It will be your responsibility to prove to the court that the purchase was necessary. You will also have a chance to defend yourself against the suit if you can prove you had the intention to repay the debt and show that you made an effort to do so before filing for bankruptcy. If the court decides this purchase was unnecessary—or that it was considered fraudulent—your plastic surgery debt will be deemed non-dischargeable and you will still be responsible for paying off this debt.

Luckily, this only applies to luxury debt accrued within the 60 days before filing for bankruptcy. It is very likely that debt from plastic surgery accumulated before the preceding 60 days will be included as dischargeable debt in the final decision for your bankruptcy case. Whether the plastic surgery debt was from elective surgical or non-surgical medical procedures should not make a difference in making it eligible to be discharged under either Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Bankruptcy is meant to allow people to move forward from previous financial mistakes or setbacks, and plastic surgery debt is no exception.

There can be a lot of myths and misconceptions surrounding bankruptcy proceedings. Veitengruber Law is experienced in providing full-service debt relief solutions. We understand the stress caused by seemingly insurmountable debt and we work hard to offer solutions to even the most difficult financial problems. We know that bankruptcy is not the end of the line, but a chance for our clients to get back on their feet and on the road to financial health. We offer customized bankruptcy analysis based on your specific goals and financial needs. Call us today at 732-852-7295 for your free, no-obligation consultation with our experienced team of bankruptcy experts.

Filing for Bankruptcy in NJ = Finding Financial Freedom!

filing for bankruptcy in NJ

If you find yourself facing unmanageable debt from credit card bills, loans, medical expenses or a variety of other potential issues, bankruptcy can provide a path towards a brighter financial future. Filing for bankruptcy in NJ can be an excellent way to take control over your finances and make the process of repaying your debts much more affordable. Unfortunately, despite the many benefits of filing for bankruptcy, many people are hesitant to file when they should. Some debtors feel a sense of failure or shame in filing for bankruptcy and wait years to file, while their financial situation becomes more unmanageable in the process. This delayed filing can be disastrous for your financial future.

A recent study by the Consumer Bankruptcy Project (CBR) found that nearly two-thirds of those who eventually file for bankruptcy report struggling under the weight of their debt for two or more years before filing. The study found that most people are filing for bankruptcy only after years of significant financial hardship. This period of time is commonly referred to as “the sweatbox.” While in the sweatbox, debtors are constantly bombarded by debt collectors, face the threat of losing their homes, and many even experience wage garnishment. Debtors in the sweatbox can find themselves in lawsuits over unpaid debt and may even be unable to pay for basic needs like food and electricity. Often times, these financial situations could have been avoided by filing for bankruptcy earlier.

When we meet with clients in the sweatbox, they almost always wish they had talked to us sooner. Often, those who wait to file for NJ bankruptcy do so with fewer assets and a much higher debt-to-income ratio than those who file earlier. Essentially, the longer you wait to file, the worse your financial situation is likely to be. On top of this, the stress and uncertainty of struggling through years of unmanageable debt will take a very real emotional and mental toll on anyone. And yet, many of our clients who finally file for bankruptcy long after the pros greatly outweigh the cons still express feelings of failure and shame.

At Veitengruber Law, our goal is to help people see bankruptcy as an opportunity for positive financial change—not as the end of the line. We work with our clients to dispel some of the prevailing myths about bankruptcy. We know that many of our clients face bankruptcy due to a number of circumstances outside of their control. Loss of employment or underemployment, divorce, medical expenses, and student loan debt are some of the most common obstacles to financial security that our clients face. We understand that no two clients are the same, which is why our debt relief solutions are created to fit your particular needs and goals. Bankruptcy is just one of the many tools we can help clients use to restore financial health.

Struggling through years living under the enormous weight of crushing debt is not a measure of personal integrity, nor is it financially advisable. Waiting too long to file for bankruptcy can put your financial security at greater risk. Don’t spend years struggling in the sweatbox. Veitengruber Law’s holistic approach to debt management and bankruptcy strategies will ensure that you receive personalized service for your specific needs. Filing for bankruptcy can be an intimidating process, but you do not have to do it alone, and working with us will not put you further in debt. Don’t wait until it’s too late.

When you call us for your free consultation, we will answer any questions you have and help you decide if bankruptcy is the right choice for your circumstances. If bankruptcy is not the right option for you, we will offer you alternative solutions that are viable in your specific situation. No risk – no obligation. We’re here to help!

Image: “FREEDOM!” by Gonzalo Baeza – licensed under CC by 4.0

Why We Stand Out as a NJ Real Estate & Debt Relief Law Firm

best attorneys in NJ

At Veitengruber Law, we strive to provide service that is above and beyond the standard. We understand that there is no one size fits all solution to financial and legal issues. Our experienced team manages every single case on an individualized basis, providing proven solutions from years of experience managing cases. Our goal is to help our clients achieve financial security with a customized plan specific to their needs. As a result of our practices, our clients are able to move forward to make stronger financial choices confidently and independently.

George established Veitengruber Law to help families and individuals in need of financial help. During his seven years of experience working as a Senior Associate for a Monmouth County debt resolution firm, George saw first-hand the toll overwhelming debt can have. When he opened his solo practice in 2010, he decided to use his vast legal and courtroom experience to help clients achieve their financial goals. Beyond just providing legal expertise and defense, George and his team stick with clients to help them learn valuable financial lessons. This holistic approach allows George to help clients even after their case has been settled, allowing them to look forward to a brighter financial future.

Veitengruber Law maintains a concentrated legal focus, allowing George to bring the full strength of his experience and success to the table for every single client. As a full-service real estate and debt relief solutions practice, we can provide unsurpassed services to our clients.

The Veitengruber Law team has years of experience in all aspects of real estate transactions from contract review to real estate presentation and closing services. Your home is typically the largest investment you will ever make. NJ real estate transactions can involve highly detailed paperwork and complex contracts. George and his team can work with you during sales, purchasing, inspections, liens, titles, and contracts so you can feel confident in your real estate transactions.

Veitengruber Law saves an average of 60 families from foreclosure eviction each year. George is highly experienced in the wide variety of legal strategies and foreclosure defenses to help keep our clients in their homes. We analyze our client’s specific circumstances and provide expert guidance on the best foreclosure alternative case-by-case. Our team will explain your options in plain language so you can understand all of your options.

We are also experienced in providing proven debt-relief solutions tailored to every situation. Our team has significant experience negotiating with difficult lenders, creditors, and other financial institutions. Our insight into the way credit card companies work informs the effective solutions we can offer our clients. Your individual debt solution may involve a mortgage modification, loan refinancing, settling with a creditor, or simply creating a good budget to follow. We make sure our debt relief solutions are realistic, appropriate, and unique to each client.

While we know bankruptcy is not a solution for every situation, we work against the myth that bankruptcy is the end of the line. Time and again, we have helped our clients take bankruptcy as a first step back to financial health. Not only can bankruptcy save your home as an automatic stay to halt a foreclosure, it can be an excellent tool to get out from under unmanageable debt. Our team will only suggest bankruptcy if it is truly the best solution for you.

Beyond our expertise and proven success, we offer an approachable experience for our clients. We understand how much stress and anxiety these heavy financial decisions can cause—and how intimidating it can be to reach out to a lawyer for help. Our goal is to make our clients as comfortable as possible throughout the entire process. We want to understand your goals and help you find comprehensive solutions to your problems. Contact us today for a free consultation!

STOP a NJ Sheriff’s Sale and KEEP YOUR HOME

NJ sheriff's sale

In New Jersey, it can take a long time to foreclose on a home. There are a lot of options to explore before you get to the point of foreclosure. If, however, you find yourself unable to work with your lender to get a loan modification and a foreclosure commences, you may be facing a sheriff sale of your home. The good news is, even at the point that a sheriff sale has been scheduled, there are still ways to stop the auction and save your home. Veitengruber Law is here to offer valuable legal advice to get you through this time sensitive situation.

After it has been decided the home will go to sheriff’s sale, the lender or the homeowner can ask the court to adjourn, or postpone, the sale temporarily. Under NJ law, the adjournment can be requested for any or no reason at all, but the homeowner can only ask for adjournment twice whereas the lender can ask as many times as they want. These adjournments last for two weeks and give the homeowner time to consider their options.

In New Jersey, each county has its own adjournment procedures and sets its own costs for requests. Generally, the fee is small – around $28 – in most counties. All requests for adjournment must be made in person and the fee must be paid up front. The request can be made in a letter listing the docket number and sheriff sale number along with the property address and date of the sale. Some counties offer a standard form to request the adjournment. We can help you submit this request to make sure you are approved for your two week adjournment.

In limited situations, the homeowner can ask for additional adjournments. This formal request to the Court would only be granted for good cause, like if a sale of the home is pending or the homeowner is likely to be approved for a loan modification. Additional requests for adjournment can be costly and are at the full discretion of the judge, so it is important to try to work toward a solution within the time limits provided by your two allotted adjournments.

Once the sale of the home has been stalled or stopped, you have a few options to consider. Because you have missed more than three payments, the loan is declared to be in default and the lender will not just let you start paying again to catch-up on missed payments. These missed payments and late fees are combined with any real estate taxes or insurance that has been paid by the lender along with any legal fees to make up the “arrears.” The arrears must be paid before the lender will allow you to start making monthly payments again.

There are a few ways to pay off the arrears. The first is to pay them off in one lump sum, which can be difficult if not impossible for most people. The second is to negotiate a loan modification with your lender and have the arrears added to the principal balance of the loan. Even if you have tried and failed to get a loan modification in the past, with Veitengruber Law’s help it may still be possible to work out a loan modification. This could permanently close your foreclosure case and save your home. A loan modification is often the most ideal way to resolve a foreclosure case and we will do everything they can to work toward this goal.

The final option to repay arrears and end your foreclosure case while keeping your home is to file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Once bankruptcy is declared, a sheriff sale of your home will be immediately stopped. While the idea of filing for bankruptcy can seem intimidating, bankruptcy is actually a very useful legal tool to get back on top of your finances. A Chapter 13 bankruptcy will likely save your home from foreclosure and also give you options to mitigate your debts. If you also have excessive credit card debt or other debt from medical or other unplanned expenses, these debts can be managed within the same bankruptcy case. Working with an experienced  bankruptcy law attorney who also provides foreclosure defense services will help you determine the best way to save your home and get you on the path to a better financial future.

There are a lot of considerations to take into account when facing a sheriff sale of your home in New Jersey. We understand that this is a deeply personal decision and we will be there to support you every step of the way. Don’t assume you are out of options because a sheriff’s sale is scheduled. Contact us today for an expert assessment of your situation and save your home!