Choose a NJ Bankruptcy Attorney Who can Offer Personalized, Caring Representation

Are you hesitating to call an attorney because you are experiencing financial hardship and think you may soon be facing bankruptcy? Are you involved in a complex legal case involving a large amount of money or debt? In the case of bankruptcy, hindsight is not better than foresight, so act in a timely manner and choose a bankruptcy attorney who can provide you with personalized, compassionate representation. Taking this action is both very personal and intimidating at the same time.


At Veitengruber Law, we want to provide you with advice on your financial needs and help put your mind at ease to regain control of your life.


Financial strain can hit anyone at any time. Dedicated, hard working individuals may lose their job or get laid off. Health insurance costs may skyrocket. Divorce can affect both parties financially. A medical emergency, sudden sickness, or unexpected hospitalization may cause never-ending medical bills. You may face a complex legal action with a hefty amount of debt. Each one of these or any combination can lead to financial worries, causing great stress and making you feel as if you’re losing control of your life.

A good bankruptcy attorney will analyze your income and expenses/debts along with real estate assets to determine if bankruptcy is the path you should take, or recommend other alternatives such as loan consolidation, short sale, debt negotiations, debt forgiveness, etc. If filing for bankruptcy is the only option, you want to make sure your attorney completes the filing timely and accurately. They will guide you through the process and lead you back to financial recovery through a tailor-made plan specifically for you. They also need to ensure that in the aftermath of filing for bankruptcy, they minimize any adverse consequences for you.

Many myths surround bankruptcy, with the most common involving losing everything or losing a home to foreclosure. Many times, filing bankruptcy can ease your financial burdens by assisting with late mortgage payments, giving you the chance to catch up on payments, providing an avenue for safe wage garnishments, halting the repossession process, and erasing your debt.

Most assets are retained in Chapter 7 bankruptcy and individuals and families with a steady income can preserve their assets through a Chapter 13 payment plan. Chapter 7 bankruptcy may require you to liquidate assets to pay creditors, however all property is exempt. Chapter 13 bankruptcy allows you to adjust your debt by making regular payments based on your income.

Veitengruber Law has team members who specialize in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy. Our team also expertly handles real estate law and transactions, short sales, deed in lieu of, and quit claim matters. We can provide housing and urban development (low-income) counseling and specialize in loan modifications, foreclosure defense and home retention.

At Veitengruber Law, we have confident, highly educated and qualified attorneys, paralegals and other legal aides to assist you in overcoming your financial struggles. Our professionals will translate legal jargon into “layman’s terms” so that you understand completely what you’re facing and what your recovery plan will be. We understand what you’re going through, not only because are we experts in our field, but most importantly, we are people. We want to help you be financially healthy and fiscally fit. Call us today for a free consultation to put you on the path towards financial fitnesss.

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What are the Duties of a Bankruptcy Trustee?

 

A NJ bankruptcy trustee is responsible for completing the administrative tasks of a specific bankruptcy case and is typically appointed by the New Jersey bankruptcy court. These individuals are not judges, but are sometimes lawyers, though that is not a requirement. The trustee’s jobs include (but are not limited to): management of all of the petitioner’s bankruptcy paperwork and documentation, leading the meeting of creditors, and handling the liquidation of the petitioner’s assets.

When filing for bankruptcy, you need to first gather the necessary information and paperwork, either on your own or with the guidance of your New Jersey bankruptcy attorney. Based on the New Jersey exemptions, it’s also important to figure out what property (of yours) is exempt from seizure. Once you have filed for bankruptcy, the bankruptcy court will take legal control of all debts and properties that are not free from New Jersey exemptions.

The next step in a NJ bankruptcy case is when a trustee will be assigned. His or her responsibility is to review your paperwork in a detailed manner, especially any possessions and exemptions you want to claim. You may contest any decisions or rulings made by your trustee. About one month after you’ve filed, the trustee will be responsible for calling a meeting of creditors. The debtor must attend this meeting.

A trustee either deals with Chapter 7 cases, where the profit is made from liquidating (selling) the petitioner’s nonexempt property, or Chapter 13 cases, in which the profit comes in the form of a repayment plan. Because the trustee receives a portion of what he or she can collect for the filer’s creditors, the trustee has a powerful incentive to collect as much as possible for the creditors.

Regarding Chapter 7 cases, there are typically no non-exempt assets. If there are non-exempt assets, you will have to release non-exempt property, or the cash equivalent of its market value, to the trustee. This takes place following the meeting of creditors. The trustee will then split the proceeds from selling this property to the creditors. In some cases, if the property does not have a high value, the trustee may turn the property back over to you.

Regarding Chapter 13 cases, the trustee is responsible for handling the most important piece of the puzzle – the repayment plan. The trustee will work with the filer to set up a repayment plan of his or her debts. While the filer is in the process of repaying creditors, the trustee will be responsible for collecting the monthly payments and distributing them to the creditors. The trustee will also give the petititioner occasional updates on who has been paid and how much is still owed to each creditor.

Because bankruptcy trustees have a significant role and power in the bankruptcy system, it’s important to start off on the right foot with the trustee that is assigned to your case. A working relationship with your trustee will be vital, especially if you are involved in a Chapter 13 case. Be meticulous and honest when completing the bankruptcy forms and make sure you let the trustee know immediately if you’ve made a mistake. Open communication will make the bankruptcy process easier for both you and the bankruptcy trustee.

Image: “November 9th” by Kate Hiscock – licensed under CC 2.0

How to Sell Your Home Before Your Lender Forecloses

nj bankruptcy attorney

Many times here on our bankruptcy blog, we describe situations where homeowners want to save their homes. Filing for bankruptcy sets the Automatic Stay into motion, which in turn prevents a home from being foreclosed upon. The length of the bankruptcy case and the anticipated outcome of a discharge of debts allows those homeowners (who desire it) the ability to adjust their debt-to-income ratio enough to keep their home via reaffirmation.

However, sometimes, a financially distressed homeowner doesn’t want to save their home. They may wish to downsize or move into a more affordable geographical location. Foreclosure, then, is not their ideal outcome, because they’ll end up with no money from the sale of the home, their credit scores will drop, and they could end up owing a deficiency judgment.

In these situations, selling the home is the desired outcome.

What’s the problem, then? Just sell the house and get on with things, right? The dilemma arises when homeowners have fallen behind on their mortgage payments and their lender is threatening to foreclose before they have a chance to get the house listed on the market.

If you do not want to keep your current house, but you’re simply short on time due to the immediate threat of foreclosure and sheriff’s sale, you’re in luck. You came to the right place, because we can help gain you enough time to get your property sold to a proper buyer rather than through a foreclosure bidding auction.

Why not just let your home go to foreclosure sale? A sale’s a sale, right?

Actually, no. Very, very much NO. However, many homeowners who’ve found themselves face-to-face with a foreclosure don’t realize they can take action toward an end goal of selling their home even when the home is actively being foreclosed upon. That’s right – this is possible even if you’re behind on your mortgage payments – or not making them at all.

Homes that sell via foreclosure auction or “sheriff’s sale” (find out why it’s called that here) almost always sell for significantly less than their real time market value. That is the #1 reason that you should consider trying to list your home for sale before sheriff’s sale.

For those homeowners who know they cannot continue living and maintaining their current lifestyle (i.e. high mortgage payments and property taxes), the last thing needed is the possibility of a deficiency judgement.

A deficiency judgement isn’t the only reason to avoid foreclosure.

By beating your lender to the punch and selling your home before they have a chance to pull the rug out from under you, you gain the opportunity for a substantially higher sale price. This will guarantee that all of your missed payments, late fees and interest is paid back to your lender, causing a domino effect of good results:

  1. Your foreclosure will be dismissed.
  2. You may end up with some equity in your pocket.
  3. Other dischargeable debts can be eliminated or greatly reduced.

Filing for bankruptcy in New Jersey should be viewed as a valuable tool that can be used to right a financial situation gone awry. The key to getting all of your ducks in a row, however, is working with the right NJ bankruptcy attorney. Timing is everything; don’t delay making a move on what can potentially turn into a disaster. Take action now, and you can walk right into a story with a happy ending.

 

What Everyone Should Know About Chapter 13 and SSDI Benefits

Many times, individuals whose only income is Social Security Disability Insurance benefits (SSDI) have difficulty keeping up with paying creditors and debts and may have to file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy. There can be a deep internal struggle with choosing this path due to the fear of losing their SSDI benefits.

The Social Security Act provides protection to Americans who become disabled and have worked long enough and paid Social Security taxes. Disability benefits are available to those (previously and currently) employed workers and their survivors who have paid into the system and can no longer work. These benefits, although helpful, equate to only a portion of what a working individual previously earned.

If an individual receives approval to collect disability benefits, the amount of the benefit is not determined by the severity of the disability or their earnings when they were employed. The Social Security Administration calculates the amount of Social Security taxes an individual has paid on their income over the many years they’ve worked and averages them. A formula is applied to this average using percentages called “bend points.” As a result, any person’s benefit payment will only amount to a percentage of what their earnings were while working. Payment benefits paid to individuals and/or their survivors through SSDI payment ranged from $700-$1,700 per month in 2017.

In almost all cases, this protection will not be overruled by bankruptcy. The most common protection for these benefits, by statutory definition, is that Social Security income is excluded as income being available to repay creditors. In other words, these benefits are not calculated as disposable income or financial assets to determine payment amounts used to pay back unsecured creditors.

42 U.S.C. 407 (Section 207 of the Social Security Act) provides protection in the form of a broad federal non-bankruptcy exemption. The statute provides that “none of the monies paid or payable or rights existing under this subchapter [of the Social Security Act] shall be subject to execution, levy, attachment, garnishment, or other legal process, or to the operation of bankruptcy or insolvency law.” Other federal laws allot exceptions to this protection outside of bankruptcy for established child support or alimony obligations, federal taxes or other obligations to the federal government. Most times, even debtors that have these responsibilities will still have protection of their benefits in bankruptcy. However, other bankruptcy laws, such as priority creditor laws, may require these responsibilities be paid from another income source.

To reiterate, in several instances, Congress has clearly stated that Social Security benefits should not be included in determining financial assets that are used to compensate creditors in a bankruptcy case. Additionally, the Social Security Administration has said it will not honor court orders to turn over an individual’s Social Security benefits to a bankruptcy trustee.

The Social Security Administration has very strict guidelines on what their benefits can be used for as they were created to assist disabled individuals with basic needs such as food, clothing and shelter. Because of this, you should keep your SSDI benefits in a separate checking or savings account and keep accurate records of income and expenses, so they are traceable. Commingling of your household income and your Social Security Disability benefits may cause confusion and complications. Keeping these monies separate will help you avoid losing protection of those benefits.

Still have unanswered questions or have a unique case not addressed here? Please schedule a free consultation with Veitengruber Law in Bordentown or Wall, NJ to learn how you can continue to receive your income from disability payments while filing for bankruptcy.

Image: “Surprise” by Tobias Scheck – licensed under CC 2.0

Can I Accept a Cash Gift While in Chapter 13?

chapter 13 bankruptcy

Filing for a chapter 13 bankruptcy in New Jersey means you’re taking steps to right your financial situation, which may have gotten off-kilter. Some of your debts will be reduced or eliminated through the bankruptcy process, and your remaining debts will be reorganized in such a way that makes them manageable.

After your chapter 13 case has ended, you and your bankruptcy attorney will agree to a repayment plan that is typically laid out over a 3-5 year period, making your monthly payments much lower. Once you’ve been granted a chapter 13 reorganization, you are generally not permitted to take on any new debts until you’ve successfully paid off your existing debts.

Incurring a new debt after filing for chapter 13 bankruptcy is only allowed if you get specific court permission, and this will be granted in very select circumstances only. So, if you’re contemplating buying a new car or making another relatively large purchase, be aware that court approval is needed first. If you fail to get court approval before taking on more debt during your bankruptcy repayment period, your case can be dismissed.

I need a working car; what are my options while in bankruptcy?

With all of that being said – you’ve found yourself in a pickle. While you’re exceedingly grateful for the opportunity of a chapter 13, you may now discover that your vehicle has “died,” and the best financial choice is to replace it rather than to continue making expensive repairs. This is a valid example of when you could petition the court to be able to take on an auto loan, but BE CAREFUL.

Before doing so, pour through all of your financials with a fine toothed comb. You must be absolutely certain that you will be able to make the new loan payments in addition to your debt repayment plan as laid out in your chapter 13 case.

Another question that many debtors have involves receiving a cash gift after filing for chapter 13. Let’s say that your mother, who knows your family needs a working vehicle so that you can get to work and earn money, wants to help you out by gifting you some or all of the money needed to buy that vehicle.

Can I accept cash gifts while in bankruptcy?

Yes, in short. But, before you accept any money from anyone, you are required to report it to your bankruptcy trustee. Any incoming money, above and beyond your paycheck, whether via gift or other windfall (inheritance, etc), is considered to be additional income in the eyes of the bankruptcy court.

Unless you receive only a very nominal gift (for example, $50 in a birthday card), it is of the utmost importance that you report any and all cash gifts while you are working on paying off a chapter 13 bankruptcy.

If your question has not been answered in full here, please contact your NJ bankruptcy attorney, who is best equipped to answer specific questions about your unique case details.

Fear of Filing: What’s Keeping You from Bankruptcy Relief?

Without a doubt, money incites emotion.

What emotion depends on the specifics of your financial situation. Suddenly getting a substantial raise at work gives a feeling of success and relief. Coming into an unexpected windfall of money can evoke a sense of thrill and excitement. Steadily watching the number in your bank account dwindle inevitably leads to anxiety, stress, and panic.

Realizing your debt is higher than you can handle can provoke a fear that feels like you’re drowning. Learning that you have solid options to get out of debt when you thought it was an impossibility should instill a solid sense of comfort. Unfortunately, the thought of filing for bankruptcy comes with its own set of complex and confusing emotions.

Even though you may know and logically understand how the New Jersey bankruptcy process can eradicate a large percentage of your debts, you may hesitate to take the necessary steps to file. You’re not alone. In general, those who know they need to file for bankruptcy but are afraid to do so, are afraid of one (or more) of the following:

Ridicule/social embarrassment

Yes, it is more socially acceptable today to file for bankruptcy, but this fear isn’t unfounded. You may have some naysayers and Negative Nanceys if you file for bankruptcy. While they may tsk tsk behind your back, what’s most important is getting your financial life back on track. What will the naysayers have to cluck about when all of your bills are current and you’re able to rise above your strife? Keep your eye on the prize, and kick any and all negativity to the curb.

Job loss/difficulty finding future employment

In order to assuage this particular fear, it’s always a good idea to discuss a potential bankruptcy with your current employer before filing. An informed boss is much better than one who finds himself “hoodwinked.” As long as your higher-ups and HR department give you the green light, you’ve got nothing to fret about.

As for future employment, as long as you keep your nose to the grindstone and make the most of filing for bankruptcy, chances are good that a potential future employer will look at your overall financial picture rather than zero in on just one incident. Bankruptcy discharge is your opportunity to get a strong foothold where your finances are concerned. By using bankruptcy as a tool, you can get out of (and stay out of) debt, improve your credit score, and completely turn your life around.

Inability to buy a home/fear of losing your current home

It’s true that filing for NJ bankruptcy will lower your credit score temporarily. This does mean that making large purchases that will require a loan are off the table, but only in the short-term! By remaining steadfastly dedicated to cleaning up your financial past, a lender will see that you’ve made a lasting change. In just a year or two, you will be able to make large purchases again.

Losing your home is a huge fear for almost everyone when they think about bankruptcy, although this fear is largely unfounded. Now, if you should decide that your home mortgage is out of your budget – you can decide to go forward with a short sale or foreclosure in order to downsize. However, if you would be able to successfully make your mortgage payments if your other debts were gone or significantly reduced, filing for bankruptcy in New Jersey triggers the automatic stay.

Do you have other fears about filing for bankruptcy that weren’t mentioned here? Call us; talk to us. We can walk you through what you’re afraid of and help you understand the process. We’ll give you real, honest feedback, even if that means bankruptcy isn’t right for you.

Collection Defense vs NJ Bankruptcy

If you have been sued by a collections company or “debt collector,” and the debt truly belongs to you, the most important piece of advice is: Do not ignore the lawsuit.

With that being said, people in your position naturally wonder if they have options. Being sued for a debt that perhaps you thought had been forgiven, or that had reached its statute of limitations, can come as a surprise. Many times we put these things out of our minds because it is easier than focusing on it and worrying about it.

Unfortunately, by putting a large debt that you failed to repay out of your mind, you are now faced with a lawsuit that asks you for the entire lump sum that you owe. This sum may even be larger than you remember due to late fees, attorney fees for the collections agency, and interest.

Is filing for bankruptcy your only option?

While it is impossible to give a blanket answer to this question (as everyone’s case will vary wildly) – the general answer is that no, bankruptcy is not your only option when you are being sued for an unpaid debt.

There are several things your NJ bankruptcy attorney will ask when you meet with him or her. Is this your only significant debt? What is your income? Can you repay this debt if it is broken down into payments?

If you have other debts along with the one in the lawsuit, and your income doesn’t allow you to get ahead on paying them back, it may be that bankruptcy is right for your situation.

Can you negotiate with the debt collector?

On the flip side, if the debt in this lawsuit is literally your only debt (outside of your mortgage and car payment), and your income is steady, you might want to have your bankruptcy/debt resolution attorney negotiate with the collection company.

For example, if your unpaid debt amount is $15,000, you may be able to talk the debt collector down several thousand if you pay in a lump sum. It is also possible to negotiate a payment schedule if you wish to avoid bankruptcy.

Is collection defense an option for you?

Collection defense is only appropriate if the debt in the lawsuit doesn’t belong to you, or if the lawsuit contains errors. So, if you are being sued in error, then collection defense is an option, but the reason many people opt for a different resolution is that collection defense representation can get expensive. Regardless of how much you pay your attorney, you can still end up losing the case, even if the debt collector is in the wrong. This is because NJ law doesn’t require strict proof of signed agreements when it comes to credit cards. Therefore, you may end up owing hefty attorney’s fees and still have to repay the debt in full when all is said and done if you go this route.

The only way to know for sure which direction you should go is to sit down with a NJ bankruptcy lawyer or debt resolution attorney. Often, bankruptcy attorneys also specialize in credit repair and debt resolution strategies other than bankruptcy, so look for an attorney who is well-versed in all areas in which you need assistance.

Should I Pay my Debts or Hire a Bankruptcy Attorney?

bankruptcy attorney nj

When you are face to face with a huge pile of unpaid debt, you might wonder if it would be more cost effective to put a pay-off plan into effect or to make an appointment with a bankruptcy attorney. Naturally, both options are going to cost money – but there are a few questions you can ask yourself to help you determine which option will end up costing you less in the end.

Firstly, it must be said that there isn’t a cut-and-dry, cookie cutter answer to this question, so please take the advice herein with that knowledge. There are a number of variables that will affect the direction you ultimately choose to take, like:

  • How much debt do you have?
  • What type(s) of debt do you have?
  • What is your current income?
  • Do you foresee your income increasing in the near future?
  • Is there a potential financial windfall in your near future (like a work bonus)?
  • How long do you want to spend paying off your debt?
  • Are you ok with losing credit score points (temporarily)?

If you are currently not even (or barely) able to make the minimum payment each month on sky high credit card debt, you’re looking at a very long road ahead and you will have paid a huge amount of interest at the end of your debt pay-off journey. In this case, filing for bankruptcy looks like it would be a better decision, because your bankruptcy attorney’s fees are likely to cost you less than how much you’ll be paying in interest over the years. Also, by filing for bankruptcy, you can rid yourself of your burdensome debts as soon as you case is approved for a discharge. This will allow you to start a savings account, put your child through college, or otherwise focus more of your income in a way that you weren’t able to before.

The bankruptcy route will knock your credit score down for awhile, but if you’re working with a bankruptcy attorney in NJ who knows what he’s doing, you’ll be counseled on how to potentially bring your score even higher than it is now. This can usually happen in 12-18 months after a bankruptcy discharge if you follow the recommendations given.

On the flip side of the coin – maybe you have more debt than you’d like to have but you’re not drowning in debt. This is not an uncommon situation to be in. If your income is substantial enough to handle your monthly cost of living plus (give or take) double your minimum payments on at least one of your debts, you may be a good candidate for avoiding bankruptcy.

It’s impossible to give you a completely straight answer to this question, as mentioned earlier, because everyone’s financial situation is so unique. The above general tips are just that – general – and you should base your final decision off of the in-person advice you get from an experienced NJ bankruptcy attorney. He will be able to comb through your debts and assets in order to properly guide you toward making the choice that will best fit your finances.

Get in touch with a reputable New Jersey bankruptcy attorney today – most offer free consultations, so you have nothing to lose but debt!

Can I “Cramdown” my Mortgage in a NJ Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

While it may invoke images of a young parent’s attempt to eat dinner in between meeting the constant needs of a new baby, the term “cramdown” actually has nothing to do with food (at least in our context).

Debtors who file for a chapter 13 bankruptcy have determined that they can no longer stay above water paying their monthly expenses for their current lifestyle. Chapter 13 applicants typically have a dependable job with a decent income, and they are able to pay back at least a portion of the money they owe to creditors.

During NJ chapter 13 bankruptcy proceedings, a reconfigured payment plan will be laid out for the debtor that will allow them to avoid losing valuable assets. A home loan modification and a reorganization of other unsecured debts may also be part of a chapter 13 plan.

What exactly is a “cramdown?”

Another very effective strategy employed in many chapter 13 reorganization plan is called a “cramdown.” In order for a debtor to “cram” a loan down, it must be a personal property loan, like a loan for a car, home furnishings or appliances, or investment property. An important restriction here is that, unfortunately, mortgages on principle residences cannot be crammed down.

Here’s how it works:

Let’s make it easy and use a car loan as an example. These types of loans are often crammed down in chapter 13 cases due to the rapid depreciation of all vehicles immediately upon being purchased.

If a debtor borrowed $30,000 to buy a car a number of years ago, and today still owes $20,000 on that loan, it’s important to learn the current market value of the car. Let’s say the vehicle is only “worth” $15,000 now (we’re using easy figures for this example – your numbers may vary). Even though the debtor technically owes $20,000 to the creditor, a chapter 13 allows them to cram that balance down to the amount the car is actually worth. In this case, the debtor will benefit from a reduction of his loan balance by $5,000, only owing the current value of the vehicle, or $15,000.

This same process can be applied to other personal property loans that are currently upside down. To be upside down on a loan means that a debtor owes more than the property is currently worth. The cramdown strategy can only be used during a chapter 13 bankruptcy.

The amount “left over” when a loan is crammed down in a chapter 13 will be treated like the rest of the debtor’s unsecured debts, which include loans for things that are not physical property. A portion of a debtor’s total unsecured debts can be discharged, but only after they have completed their chapter 13 payment plan (which is usually spread out over 3-5 years).

The most common types of unsecured debts in New Jersey today are credit card debt and medical debt. Other examples include personal loans, student loans, alimony arrears and child support arrears. Not all debt is dischargeable in bankruptcy. Discuss your specific debt with your bankruptcy attorney.

In addition to the lump sum reduction in the amount due on a loan, a chapter 13 bankruptcy cramdown allows many debtors to reduce the interest rate they are currently paying on some (or all) of their personal property loans.

There are other benefits to a loan cramdown as well as some limitations and timelines that must be closely adhered to. Talk to your New Jersey bankruptcy attorney to learn more, and to find out of a chapter 13 bankruptcy could be the answer you’ve been seeking.

Dear Bankruptcy,

Dear Bankruptcy,

As a follow-up to my previous correspondence with you several months ago, I write you now only to keep you apprised of the situation. I want you to know that I am not deliberately trying to hurt your feelings, but I feel it is my duty as one of your staunchest supporters to let you know the truth.

In an attempt to squelch the initial rumors I shared with you, I have worked tirelessly educating the masses regarding the misinformation that was swirling around. While I strongly believe that those who I am able to work with directly are now getting the right message about you, I have to tell you that through word of mouth I have heard that someone is still spreading rumors about you.

My intention here is to clear the air, as I will post this letter publicly in the hopes of putting a stop to what is being said behind your back. Please feel free to do the same on your end so that we can get the correct information in front of as many people as possible.

Ok, I’ll just dive into the details, then. Here goes.

(Deep breath, because these may hurt a little)

I think I told you this already, but I’ve recently opened a second office in New Jersey. Bankruptcy help is one of the main services I provide at both offices. As I’ve moved into a new location, I’ve heard some real head-shakers about you. You would never tell someone they can never get a credit card again, right? RIGHT! I mean, obviously, those who need your help will have to reel in their credit card use until you help right their financials, but I have been telling everyone who asks: YES YOU CAN GET A CREDIT CARD AFTER BANKRUPTCY comes into your life.

A friend of a friend came to me (claiming to be “asking for a friend,” sigh) with this question: Will everyone know if I’m involved with Bankruptcy? Again, I am incredulous that there is still such fear at the mere mention of your name. Times have changed, Man! Bankruptcy doesn’t post a public announcement or install a blinking red light in front of your home. However, as I’ve previously been preaching: Needing Bankruptcy’s help is nothing to be ashamed of.

“But we wanted to own a home one day” – I heard this last week from a husband and wife who approached me in town. As challenging as it may be, I continue working to convince people everywhere that an encounter with you is not a life sentence. After all, you aren’t out to attack or harm anyone; you’re here to help.

Even though you and I know that times have changed, it is apparent to me now that I still have more work to do in defending your honor. You have my word that I will continue in earnest to defeat any and all Bankruptcy myths that I encounter. You and I are in this together, friend.