The Biggest Mistake You Can Make While Saving to Buy a Home

money mistakes

When you are in the market to buy a home, the more savings you have, the better. Between closing costs, your down payment, and other home buying expenses, the out of pocket cost of buying a house can add up. It can be tempting to use your hard earned savings, a retirement fund, or even your emergency funds in order to have sufficient funds for a down payment. But cleaning out your savings to buy a home is a very bad idea—and here are three reasons why.

1. Unexpected Expenses

After you buy a home, you will need a strong emergency fund more than ever before. Your emergency fund should include at least three months of expenses saved in the event you lose employment. For a homeowner, that’s at least three months of mortgage payments, homeowner’s insurance, home maintenance, utilities, and all the little expenses that add up when you own a house. If you use your emergency savings to buy the house, you may not be able to absorb the costs of any unexpected repairs that pop up down the road. Tapping into your emergency fund to pay for your down payment or closing costs could leave you high and dry.

2. Continuing to Save, Even After Becoming a Homeowner

If you have to clean out your savings accounts in order to purchase a home, chances are you can’t actually afford the home in the first place. As soon as you sign your name on the closing paperwork, you’ll be responsible for a whole heft of new expenses, including your monthly mortgage payment, homeowners insurance, property taxes, indoor home maintenance expenses, exterior maintenance (ranging from lawn care to snow removal and SO MUCH in between), and utilities. Will you still be able to contribute to your savings account on top of these new expenses? While you may be able to afford the out of pocket expenses to buy a home on paper, if buying the home means you cannot afford to keep saving in the future, it isn’t a good financial choice. You are better off waiting to buy a home until you are in a position to purchase a home without touching your emergency savings AND keep saving.

3. Becoming “House Poor”

If you’re like most Americans, your savings fund isn’t just for emergencies—it’s also where you build up enough money for vacations, to travel to visit family, or to refresh your spring wardrobe. A house might seem worth the sacrifice now, but know that the excitement of a new home will wear off just like everything else. You don’t want to be scraping by to survive and lose the ability to enjoy other aspects of your life. Roughing it out in an affordable rental for a few more years while you save more money can allow you to continue living your preferred lifestyle while still working towards the eventual goal of homeownership.

Buying a home is exciting and it can be tempting to go for broke to finally have your own place. We recommend that you keep building your savings until you are truly ready to purchase a home. Not sure if you’re ready? Reach out to Veitengruber Law and we can tell you straight up if you should go for it now, or if you’re truly better off waiting.

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