What if I Can’t Pay Back my Personal Loan?

personal loan

Personal loans, unlike student loans, mortgages, or auto loans, can be used for almost anything. If approved, you receive a lump sum that must then be paid back in monthly installments. From big purchases to home renovations to consolidating debt, a personal loan can be a useful financial tool. But sometimes, as with anything else, “life happens.” Unexpected financial difficulties like a pay cut or medical expenses can disrupt even the most carefully planned budget. When a financial set-back occurs, it can be difficult if not impossible to keep up with bills and payments. Often, it is loans and credit cards that are the first payments to be put off. What do you do if your situation has changed since being approved for a loan and you can no longer make payments on your personal loan? Today we’ll give you a few examples of steps you can take to remedy the situation.

While most people are reluctant to talk to their lender in the event of a financial set-back, this is often the best thing you can do. In fact, most lenders will respect a proactive approach to handling the situation and appreciate your dedication to paying back the loan. The sooner you make your lender aware of the problem, the more likely they are to work with you. On the other hand, simply ignoring missed payments can result in an accumulation of late fees, collection efforts, a drop in your credit score, and even default. If there is a valid reason you cannot make the payments, your lender should understand and work with you to find a mutually agreeable solution.

Once you have taken steps to make your lender aware of your situation, they may be willing to revise the terms of your loan to make monthly payments more manageable for your new financial circumstances. Lenders who are willing to negotiate will look at your expenses, other debts, and income to determine a more realistic monthly payment. So while the total principal of the loan will remain the same, payments can be made more affordable. The solution might even be as simple as changing the monthly due date of the payments to a time when it does not conflict with other bills. You may even be able to negotiate a deferment on your payment—it doesn’t hurt to ask!

If your lender does not work with you to revise the terms of your loan and is still demanding on-time payments, you will have to find different ways to make the payments. Consider areas in your budget you could cut back on, even if it is only until you’ve paid back the loan. Determine which expenses are necessities (like food, utilities, transportation to work, etc.) and which are extra. If it is possible, try selling high dollar items, like a second car. You may even consider doing side work or getting a part-time job to help offset the cost of the loan payments. Explore all of your budget-revising options to avoid missing payments.

In the event you still cannot afford to make the payments on your loan, don’t assume all hope is lost. When you’ve done all you can do to remedy your finances and you’re still struggling, it is time to reach out for professional help. At Veitengruber Law, our team of experts has years of experience dealing with difficult lenders and assisting borrowers in getting back on the right financial track. We will negotiate with lenders on your behalf to find effective solutions for real financial relief.

We understand that not every debt problem is the same and we will work diligently to come up with a customized solution for your specific situation. Bankruptcy is not the only solution to unmanageable debt, although it may be the best solution for your circumstances. Our team will perform a holistic financial analysis to help you make informed choices about your financial future.

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