Is a NJ Real Estate Survey Really Necessary?

NJ real estate

Typically, a survey of a property listed for sale in the state of New Jersey is facilitated by a licensed surveyor who follows regulations enforced by NJ laws. These surveys are generally performed prior to a new owner buying the property. Although a buyer may not feel that a survey is necessary, if they are utilizing a mortgage loan to finance, many lenders in NJ will require a survey prior to closing. If your lender does not require a survey be performed, you can skip it, but there are a lot of good reasons to consider going through with a survey anyway.

What does a survey of the property typically include?

A survey of a property includes VERY important information for you to know before jumping into purchasing. For instance, it will state exactly where your property line starts and ends as well as any renovations or work that has been done to the property. It will also disclaim building lines and setbacks, which you’ll need if you decide to make changes to your home or property. With an official survey completed, you will know the zoning laws concerning adjacent buildings or sidewalks.  Other things like utility easements (such as where lines, poles, pipes etc. lie or run) will also be included so that you know if everything is up to code. A survey also contains details of any neighbor-shared part of the property such as a driveway or a neighbor’s ability to drive on your property to get to their own.

Why should I obtain a survey of my potential future home?

In addition to the reasons mentioned above, there are even more ways a survey can help you in the future – after purchasing. Some of these details include information on existing fences that may be encroaching onto your property. Suppose you wanted to start something as simple as a garden or build a patio but the property backs up to a stream/creek/pond or other body of water? It is imperative to know about flood history or underground waters that are not visible to the naked eye. Furthermore if the property is next to a cemetery, the survey will reveal any family plots or cemeteries existing on the land.

There may also be zoning restrictions that are revealed during a survey. Zoning restrictions can affect how you may use the property. This would be extremely important, especially if you were thinking of renovations that include something like an underground pool. Even if there were NOT any zoning restrictions found, you would still need and want to know things like where pipelines, water lines, catch basins, vaults, and wires may run. Additionally, any existing trees on the property may affect utility lines. If so, local utility company/ies may have established privilege to use part of the property for upkeep of the lines. They may even have a say on how tall trees can grow on your lot.

Lastly, before a contract on the home can be drawn up, the seller has to show a good standing title for the home. A survey can be very helpful in showing any zoning violations, easements, or other defects in the title. These are just several of many important disclosures you will want to know prior to signing your John Hancock on the contract paperwork.

 

How can I get more information about NJ real estate surveys?

At Veitengruber Law, we can help you navigate the ins and outs of buying a potential property. We can help you fully understand just what you may be getting into before making a potentially huge mistake in an investment. Just contact us for a FREE one-hour consultation, and we can begin helping you make the best decision about obtaining a survey, and so much more.

 

 

 

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