The Ins and Outs of Chapter 7 Bankruptcy in New Jersey

chapter 7 bankruptcy in new jersey

Chapter 7 bankruptcy in New Jersey is designed to allow a debtor to liquidate their debts if they are unable to repay their debts. If you are overwhelmed by personal debt and have not filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy within the past eight years, read on to find out if Chapter 7 bankruptcy might be the first step toward regaining financial health and freedom.

Who qualifies for Chapter 7 bankruptcy?

You must meet the following criteria to be eligible to file Ch. 7:

  • Your income must be lower than the median income in New Jersey. This is called the means test.
  • Your debts, excepting those that are non-dischargeable under any conditions (examples include income tax debt, unpaid child support, student loans, and alimony), can all be erased under Chapter 7. If the majority of your debt is dischargeable, Chapter 7 may be right for you.
  • You must undergo credit counseling. This counseling cannot be obtained more than 180 days prior to filing your petition.

Do I need an attorney’s help filing?

It is extremely important that your filing paperwork be entirely truthful and accurate. Unfortunately, debtors often make mistakes on their Schedule I form.

Schedule I is the form that you’ll fill out listing all of your income, including your spouse’s income and income from any and all other sources. Making a single significant error on this form will result in the immediate dismissal of your case.

It should go without saying that falsifying your bankruptcy paperwork intentionally carries penalties up to and including time in prison. Working openly and honestly with a qualified attorney will guarantee that your Schedule I paperwork is correct and truthful. Under no circumstances should you attempt to hide a source of income from your bankruptcy attorney.

How will filing Chapter 7 help me?

While any of the aforementioned non-dischargeable debts will remain your responsibility, the majority of debts will be erased. You will not owe creditors anything further.

What will happen to my major assets?

If your spouse owns your home jointly, or if you have kept current on your mortgage payments despite your financial situation, you may qualify to keep your home. Unless you can definitively prove you need your car or truck for your job, your vehicle may be repossessed to contribute to the repayment of your debts.

Once you’ve obtained credit counseling, you can file a petition for bankruptcy with the court. A trustee will then be appointed to you. You will be required to surrender all of your nonexempt assets and divide the proceeds amongst your creditors.

What are my options if filing Chapter 7 doesn’t provide me enough debt relief?

Sometimes even after a Ch. 7 discharge of debts is granted, you may still have a burdensome level of non-dischargeable debt remaining. While bankruptcy law has filing limits intended to prevent debtors from abusing the system and persisting in irresponsible financial habits, you ARE permitted to file for Chapter 13 if you are doing so in order to make your remaining debt manageable. While the result will not be a significant reduction in the amount of money you owe, your attorney will negotiate favorable repayment terms so that you will not be crushed by your debts.

Additionally, filing for Chapter 13 after you’ve filed for Chapter 7 will prevent your creditors and lenders from garnishing your wages, foreclosing your home, or repossessing your vehicle. Consult with your NJ bankruptcy attorney if you have been attempting to pay your debts for at least one month after your Chapter 7 has been granted and you are still struggling to make ends meet.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: