How Owning a Home in NJ Affects Your Net Worth

When it comes to numbers, especially finances, some of us become easily overwhelmed, which is totally normal. There are so many important numbers involved in staying afloat financially. Many of us keep close tabs on our various accounts such as our savings account, checking account, retirement accounts, and investment accounts. Though we attempt to use these accounts to prepare for the future and try our hardest to ensure that we will be financially safe, there is one critical number that defines how successful you will be at building your assets for the future. That is your net worth.

Net worth is probably a term you’ve heard before, but may not fully understand what it means. Your net worth is equal to your total assets minus your total liabilities. Your liabilities are the total amounts of money that you owe to any creditor. They are easier to calculate, as you most likely receive a reminder at the end of each month that lays out the exact amount you owe to creditors. On the other hand, it can be more challenging to accurately calculate your assets. You don’t want to give yourself a dishonest sense of financial security by overestimating your net worth, so always err on the conservative side.

Your house is probably the most valuable asset that’s in your name, so its monetary value will have the most influence on your net worth calculation. To estimate your home’s value, work with an experienced real estate professional. In general, it’s best to be conservative when estimating values of assets such as vehicles, jewelry, home furnishings, etc. Instead of basing figures off of how much you paid for it or how much you wish the valuable was worth, base it off of what you could sell the item for now.

As mentioned before, your house probably holds the most value of anything you own. Therefore, your net worth will be determined by how much equity you have in your home. When you calculate your net worth, you must subtract your liabilities, and that includes your mortgage. For example, if your home is worth $350,000, but you owe $100,000 on your mortgage, then your home will increase your net worth by $250,000 ($350,000 – $100,000 = $250,000).

Unsurprisingly, there is disagreement as to whether or not a home’s value should be included when determining net worth. Those in favor think that since a home is someone’s most valuable asset, it should absolutely be included. Those against argue that if you sold your house in order to actually use the money from the sale, then you may not have somewhere to live. To consider both opinions, many people will create two net worth calculations: one including a home’s value (as an asset and liability if a mortgage still exists) and one without it (continuing to include the liability if there is still a mortgage to be paid).

In New Jersey, depending on where you live, the value of land may be high, low, or somewhere in the middle. Depending on land value and the current market in the area, home prices are going to fluctuate. Remembering what you’ve learned so far, if a house is valued at a higher amount, an individual is going to have an increased net worth. If you purchase a home in a wealthier area, this will add more to your net worth opposed to if you bought a home in a middle or lower class area.

Another thing to take into consideration is a vacation home or rental property. These can actually have a positive influence on your net worth. Condos are usually purchased as vacation homes and are bought with cash. Good news: your net worth will increase by the same amount that the home is valued at, if you paid in cash.

Hopefully, net worth makes a tad more sense now and you know how owning a home will affect it. Since it’s a critical number to consider in the realm of finances, it’s important to know what goes into calculating that number. If you have more questions, or are looking for help with calculating your net worth, reach out to a real estate team near you.

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