Top 5 New Jersey Bankruptcy Myths, Busted

New Jersey bankruptcy

Do you find yourself questioning the truth of the latest snippets of gossip you hear on the news? You’re not the only one, especially since many bits of information we hear travel through a variety of sources before reaching us. There’s no doubt that you hear and read financial updates or facts on the news, radio, newspaper, online, etc. How do you know what to believe?

The news media is always informing the public about foreclosure, bankruptcy, real estate matters, and many other points that can be relevant to the average person. The word “bankrupt” is becoming more common in our vocabulary today, but the bottom line is that there are numerous myths about bankruptcy. Whether or not you have faced bankruptcy in your personal life or you know someone that has, debunking these myths could be useful for you; you never know when they might come in handy.

Myth #1: Every possession will be taken away from you.

Fact: Good news: every state has laws to protect you, though they do vary from state to state. The laws that we’re talking about are called exemptions, which protect your home, family heirlooms, car, and retirement savings. It’s possible to file for Chapter 13 bankruptcy, which involves a repayment plan, in the case that you have more equity in your home than what is protected by the exemptions. Because of these laws, the debtor is entitled to retain most of his property, furniture, a decent amount of jewelry, and some money. You won’t lose all of your possessions if you file for bankruptcy.

Myth #2: Filing for bankruptcy will damage your credit for at least 10 years.

Fact: This is completely false. It’s important to distinguish that having bankruptcy on your credit report for 10 years doesn’t necessarily mean that it will have a totally negative effect. Not all things reported on your credit report are considered bad. Interestingly enough, our clients’ credit scores usually increase after filing for bankruptcy. Normally, a person will be able to re-establish their credit score within two to four years after filing. If this is not happening for you, you may be working with the wrong debt resolution specialist!

Myth #3: You can decide to list only the debt you want to eliminate when filing for bankruptcy.

Fact: Actually all debts must be included. It’s not your choice to dismiss a creditor just because you plan on continuing to pay their bill. You are able to make voluntary payments to family or medical service providers if you choose. Once your case has been dismissed, you can continue to pay off your debts.

Myth #4: Everyone will know that you filed for bankruptcy.

Fact: Yes, bankruptcy is a public record, and anyone could search your history, but the amount of filings each month is so large. Most likely, no one is going to find out that you’ve filed for bankruptcy. Obviously, celebrity bankruptcy filings are big news; we always see them in the media. Let’s think back, though: when is the last time you researched who filed for bankruptcy in your neighborhood?

Myth #5: Being married means both you and your spouse will have to file.

Fact: If both the husband and wife are in debt, then yes, it would be smart for both of them to file. There is no legal mandate that both spouses have to file. If you don’t have any joint debt, then there is no need for your spouse to file either. On the other hand, if both spouses need to file, they should do it jointly to avoid paying two fees.

If you have questions that haven’t been answered herein, please call us so we can help you further understand the NJ bankruptcy process.

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