Self-Employment Income Taxes: The Basics

It’s time to file taxes: everyone’s favorite time of year! Taxes are collected by the government each year in order to pay for public services and goods. You may have heard of the Internal Revenue Service, also known as the IRS, which is the nation’s tax collection agency. For many individuals, their taxes are paid through withholding, meaning that the money is taken out of each paycheck. For other individuals, specifically the self-employed, this is not the case.

You are considered self-employed if you meet any of these requirements. If so,  it will be necessary for you to file self-employment income taxes.

·        You own or operate a trade or business as an independent contractor or sole proprietor

·        You are a partner or member in a partnership that runs a business or trade

·        You are in business for yourself (this includes part-time business)

·        You file a business tax return through Schedule K-1

Self-employed individuals are required to pay an income tax as well as a Social Security and Medicare tax. The Social Security and Medicare taxes are similar to those withheld from the paycheck of normal wage earners. You might be asking: exactly what is the self-employment tax rate? It is currently 15.3% on net earnings, but a limit is set as to how much can be paid into the Social Security portion each year.

To know if you have to pay self-employment tax and income tax, you have to calculate your net earnings and net loss. This step is simple: subtract your business expenses from your business income. If your answer is positive, congrats, you made a profit. If your answer is negative, you lost money. If your overall earnings were over $400, you are required to submit an income tax return form. Even if your net earnings were less than $400, you have to submit the form if you meet any of the requirements in the Form 1040 instructions.

The IRS will require you to submit quarterly estimated taxes if you plan to owe more than $1,000 in taxes when you file the return. These taxes are submitted April 15, July 15, September 15, and January 15, or each quarter. If you do not file these taxes, the IRS can fine or penalize you for underpayment. To submit these taxes, you will fill out Form 1040-ES, which will assist you in figuring out if you have to pay estimated taxes and also calculating the amount you owe for estimated taxes. You will need your annual tax return from the previous year to fill out Form 1040-ES. Though the IRS does not require this form to be turned in, it is recommended that you keep it on record. Form 1040-ES contains vouchers that can be completed when you send in your quarterly payments or you can submit the payments online using the Electronic Federal Tax Payment System (EFTPS).

The type of business that you own will also play a factor in determining which form you need to complete. Sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation, and S corporation are the most common forms of businesses. A Limited Liability Company is also a business structure that has recently been allowed. Each type of business requires its own specific forms to be submitted, so be sure that you are aware of this.

These are only the basics of filing for self-employment income taxes. If you are new to self-employment, it may be helpful to meet with a professional to find out more information on paying taxes. A professional will also make sure you are completing the correct forms and filing at the necessary times. Veitengruber Law can direct you to a trustworthy and experienced tax professional – we’re happy to connect you! Don’t let the details scare you away, being self-employed can be a great opportunity to explore a passion and make a difference in the community around you.

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