Can my Landlord Evict me if I File for NJ Chapter 13 Bankruptcy?

Living paycheck-to-paycheck is the way of life for many Americans, and unfortunately, it doesn’t seem as though this has the potential to change any time soon. With the Mortgage Crisis of 2007 having lasting effects on the US real estate market, many former homeowners were forced to give up their underwater homes and downsize. Many of these people did not take on a new mortgage, but decided to become renters – at least until the real estate market righted itself.

The new renters brought on by the Mortgage Crisis (which had aftershock effects lasting well past 2010) plus those Americans who were already renting prior to 2007 combined to create a large population of US renters. While some renters have since been able to secure mortgages, a plethora of tenants feared losing yet another home to foreclosure and have continued to rent property in NJ.

The struggle of not knowing whether or not you’ll have enough money to cover your monthly living expenses is real. As of the end of 2016, nearly 11% of New Jersey residents were living at or below the poverty level, which is an excessively high number. For these New Jerseyans, figuring out how to stretch their low income to pay for food, housing and utilities is a daily burden that weighs on them constantly.

As a renter in New Jersey, filing for chapter 7 bankruptcy no longer prevents a landlord from initiating the eviction process. New legislature in 2005 protected homeowners but not tenants in chapter 7 cases. Those renters who need to file for bankruptcy to get out from under crushing debt cannot do so with a chapter 7 without risking eviction.

Although chapter 13 bankruptcy doesn’t completely wipe out debts like a chapter 7 discharge does, the good news for NJ renters is that it offers protection from eviction. All back rent that you owe your landlord can be included with your other debts when you file. A chapter 13 bankruptcy can save you from eviction by creating a payment plan wherein you will repay your landlord the arrears you owe over a set period of time that is considered reasonable.

As long as you continue to make all of your chapter 13 repayments (made through your bankruptcy trustee who then pays your creditors/landlord) along with your current rent payments, you cannot be evicted due to being behind on your rent. Your chapter 13 repayment plan will be structured in such a way that you can afford in comparison with your unsustainable living expense schedule prior to filing for bankruptcy.

It’s important to note that in order for you to avoid eviction via chapter 13 bankruptcy, you must be able to prove that you have enough income to afford your repayment plan with enough money left over every month to be able to make your current rent payments on time and in full. In addition, any landlord may evict a tenant who has endangered the property in question through illegal activities such as drug use, drug distribution or breaking the lease agreement in other dangerous ways, even if they have filed for a NJ chapter 13 bankruptcy.

 

Image: “Evicted” by Gideon – licensed under CC 2.0

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