Filing for Bankruptcy as a New Jersey Business Owner

Starting and running a small business is a very challenging endeavor, even for the most business-savvy entrepreneur. In fact, most entrepreneurs start a number of businesses before they find one that takes off. Sometimes, a business venture simply doesn’t pan out, no matter how much effort you’ve put into it.

If you’ve started struggling to pay your business lease every month – now’s the time to really start considering your options before problems begin to surface in your personal finances as well.

When your business debts have become more difficult to manage but not out of control, you may be able to salvage things with some refinancing and debt negotiation. On the other hand, if your debts are virtually unmanageable and you see no light at the end of the tunnel, filing for bankruptcy may truly be your best choice.

As a business owner, should I file for chapter 7 or chapter 13 bankruptcy?

Whether you’re filing for bankruptcy on your own or as a business, you can file for either chapter 7 or chapter 13. In both cases, you’ll have to meet certain qualifications in order to file. For example, the only instance in which you’re permitted to file chapter 13 in New Jersey as a business is if you are a sole proprietor. Corporations, partnerships and LLCs (Limited Liability Company) are not eligible for chapter 13 bankruptcy.

You can, however, file for a personal chapter 13 bankruptcy at this time, even if your business doesn’t qualify for chapter 13. In doing so, you’ll be able to keep the business assets while you repay debts through what is called a reorganization plan. This is the best bet if you want to continue running the business after you file for bankruptcy. This option may be appropriate if you made some mistakes along the way that you have now remedied, making it more likely that the business will succeed. If you don’t meet the requirements to file for chapter 13, your business may qualify for chapter 11.

Any business entity has the right to file for chapter 7 bankruptcy. If you the sole owner of the business, you will also be required to file for a personal chapter 7 bankruptcy simultaneously. This is due to the fact that sole proprietors are legally the same entity as their business. Additionally, a business that files for chapter 7 will not receive a discharge of their debts.

Again, if you wish to continue operating the business after the bankruptcy, you’ll want to file for a personal chapter 7. This will wipe out your liability for said business’s debts, which may allow you to get a better hold on things and start over with less debt overall.

If your ultimate goal is to close up shop and move on to greener pastures and your company is a partnership, LLC, or corporation, you can file for chapter 7 as a company. In doing so, you will essentially turn over all of your business assets to the bankruptcy trustee to be liquidated. This means all of your business property will be sold in order to pay back the debts you accrued that you couldn’t repay.

For more information on filing for bankruptcy as a business, request your free case evaluation at the bottom of our website’s home page. Veitengruber Law can help you determine which NJ bankruptcy is right for your unique situation.

 

Image: “Store Closed” by Chris Chan – licensed under CC 2.0

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: