NJ Wills: What is Probate?

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Most people go to great lengths to avoid even thinking about their own mortality and that of their closest loved ones. Admittedly, processing the fact that you or someone very near and dear to you will inevitably pass away can be overwhelming and sad.

Our best advice to those who are struggling with the concept of dying is to face it matter-of-factly. Being prepared for all of the details surrounding someone’s passing certainly won’t make it any easier in terms of missing them, but it will put your mind at ease regarding their estate.

What is an estate?

After someone dies, their estate consists of any and all assets (property of value) that they owned. Assets include things like real estate, vehicles, personal items, life insurance proceeds (in some cases) and money. If the deceased person owed any debts, the money in their estate will be used to pay these debts before anything can be dispersed to beneficiaries.

How do I start the process of sorting through my loved one’s estate?

If you were named as the executor of an estate that has assets, you’ll need to visit the surrogate court in the New Jersey county in which the decedent lived. This will start the NJ legal process known as probate, and it can be initiated 10 days after someone passes away.

What happens in probate?

In New Jersey, probate is necessary only if the deceased had assets in his or her name only. Official appointment of the executor will occur in probate court with the production of the will and death certificate.

If there was no will, an administrator will be assigned to the estate in probate court. As long as there are no protests of the will, surrogate court will then give full authority to either the estate executor or administrator. You can find a full list of the executor’s duties here.

Does an estate executor get paid?

In New Jersey, estate executors or administrators can be paid for their duties, which can, in certain cases, be quite time consuming. The amount they can receive is limited to 6% of any income to the estate, plus 5% of the total gross value of the estate.*

How long does it take to probate a will?

The length of time it will take for anyone’s estate to move through the probate process is dependent on how large and complicated the estate may be. On average, moderately sized estates typically make it through to the end of NJ probate within a year. More extensive and complex estates can languish in probate for up to a decade.

For more information about New Jersey probate laws call or contact our office today. In addition, take this time to make an appointment with us to draft your own estate plan.

Image credit: Bosc d’Anjou

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